Archives for January, 2007

Skamby Boat Grave Cemetery Map

The excellent Markus Andersson has made a cemetery map out of the field measurements me and Howard Williams and our collaborators took at Skamby in Kuddby parish the summer before last. This is the prettiest of Östergötland’s three boat inhumation cemeteries. We excavated grave 15, as I have blogged about repeatedly, and found it to…

Celebrating Your New Henge

Mike Parker Pearson and team have excavated part of a huge Neolithic settlement at Durrington Walls above the Salisbury plain, not far from Stonehenge. Finds are abundant and suggest that the place was a seasonal ceremonial feasting site. Says MPP, “We’re talking Britain’s first free festival. It’s part of attracting a labour force – throwing…

Mongolian Cuisine and Cursing

Dining with polyglot friends (he’s a Sinologist who also works with Georgian and Basque and speaks a bewildering variety of Asian languages, she interprets Mongolian and speaks the most exquisite Swedish), my wife and I learned something about Mongolian cuisine and cursing.

Marika Mägi, my old co-student from grad school, is head of the archaeology department at Tallinn university in Estonia. She’s organising a conference titled Rank, Gender and Society around the Baltic 400-1400 AD on 23-27 May in Kuressaare on the island of Saaremaa. Interested scholars are welcome to present papers, and Marika tells me that…

Talk in Norrköping

On Thursday 1 February at 18:30 I’m giving a talk at the Town Museum of Norrköping. The subject is my ongoing research into the political geography of late 1st Millennium Östergötland, or simply put, My Quest for the Ancient Kings. Entry is SEK 60. Hope to meet blog readers there! [More blog entries about archaeology,…

Musical Skiing

Dear Reader, I’ve just passed a lovely hour skiing on the golf course, and I am very happy. It’s -6 centigrade, loads of snow and Mr Sun is shining from a blue sky, accompanied by his pale-countenanced Sister Moon. People and dogs were out in force and we all smiled at each other as we…

Linnaeus 300

As I’ve observed before, enlisting bloggers to do marketing offers some interesting possibilities and limitations. Unlike the case with mainstream media, you can choose exactly which person will receive an advance copy of your product (preferably someone who will like it), and the blogger is likely to feel flattered that you even took her seriously…

The Gothenburg Nasty

Most archaeologists work with rescue excavations for land development, “contract archaeology”. And because of the Field-Archaeological Paradox, operative in all Western countries with strong legal protection for archaeological sites, they get to dig a lot of really nondescript things. It’s not Tut-ankh-amen’s tomb every day, kids. This is one of the reasons that I do…

One of the founding fathers of Norwegian archaeology and place-name scholarship was Oluf Rygh (1833-1899). In 1875, he became Scandinavia’s first professor of archaeology. One of the most enduring parts of his legacy is his 1885 book Norske Oldsager, “Norwegian Antiquities” (re-issued in 1999). Not because many read either the Norwegian or the French text…

Greatest Hits

John over at Stranger Fruit had a post recently on his most popular entries. Summing up, he found that controversial issues in science and religion drew the most attention. I’ve had a look at my Google Analytics as well, checking out the data for my old site since the present one has been on-line for…