i-d60600f280df3d76e2d4ba893fbe954e-ant-tidskr.jpgIn its formative late-19th century decades, Swedish archaeology had three journals with a nationwide scope (sometimes also covering Norway with which Sweden shared a king at the time). All three were published in Stockholm by the same small group of people: the Royal Academy of Letters had the academic Antiqvarisk Tidskrift för Sverige (1864-1924) and the more pop-sci-orientated Vitterhetsakademiens Månadsblad (1872-1907), and the Swedish Antiquarian Society had Svenska Fornminnesföreningens Tidskrift (1871-1905).

The two latter merged in 1906 and took the name Fornvännen. This journal is still very much alive (I’m one of its editors), while Antiqvarisk Tidskrift lingered erratically into the 1920s and was then terminated.

Project Gutenberg is a huge on-line library founded in 1971 with public-domain books, mostly ones whose copyright has expired and primarily in English. In 1992, Project Runeberg opened at the University of Linköping, offering a similar library for the Nordic countries, and additionally including full scanned bitmaps of the books’ pages. An item of particular interest to Scandinavian archaeologists and historians at Project Runeberg is an almost complete run of Antiqvarisk Tidskrift.

Meanwhile, work is in progress to scan Fornvännen’s entire run, put it on-line and to publish it from now on both on the net and on paper, using the same PDF files. Here’s a sample, including papers in English (one actually by yrs truly).

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