Archives for March, 2007

Taken Up the Slack

With Aard, I’m now back at 19,000, the Technorati rank I had with my old blog shortly before I moved to ScienceBlogs. It took a bit more than three months. Now, if only Google would give me a fookin’ PageRank…

Dreams of Ancient Glory

A recent addition to the excellent Runeberg Project e-text repository is the 1931 re-issue of Sven Petter Bexell’s 1819 work Hallands historia och beskrivning. It’s a patriotic history and description of the province of Halland, a part of Sweden’s southwest coast that belonged to Denmark for many centuries. Below is a fine example of just…

Inger Österholm 1942-2007

Inger Österholm died the night between Wednesday and Thursday after a long battle with illness. For over two decades, she was a driving force behind the Ajvide excavations on Gotland, where countless archaeology students from Stockholm and Visby received their first taste of fieldwork. Inger specialised in the Neolithic of Gotland, as seen in her…

Modern Ruins

I’ve written before about modern ruins. Here’s a great Finnish site: Tuomas Romu’s photographs. Beautiful work! Thanks to Mustafa Mond for the link.

Lars Lundqvist Blogs

My buddy Lars Lundqvist, long-time regular Dear Reader and contributor of excellent archaeopix, started a blog three weeks ago: Arkland. It’s in Swedish, it’s finely illustrated, and it’s mainly about Swedish archaeology. Yes, this is the guy who did all those cool digs at Slöinge, Vittene and Saleby. Go have a look and write a…

Toppermost of the Poppermost

Dear Reader, watch me toot my own horn (yes, I have a very supple spine). Technorati doth heed prayer. Or at least it heeds “support tickets”. So now this blog is visible again on the top-10 archaeology blogs (currently #3 with 187 linkers) and skepticism blogs (currently #9). Netwide.

As reported profusely in the mainstream media, the Chinese government is investing in iffy African regimes to secure access to the troubled continent’s raw materials. For years, Robert Mugabe’s regime in Zimbabwe has for instance received Chinese tech and training to control information flow: phone-tapping, radio jamming and internet-monitoring. You scratch my dictatorial back, I’ll…

Survival of the Sickest is a collection of eight pop-sci essays on medicine from an evolutionary perspective. It does not present any single cohesive line of argument, but the book’s title refers to one of the main themes: the idea that common hereditary diseases would not have become widespread in the gene pool unless they…

Zoolook

I no longer listen much to the synth pop I loved in my teens. The artist that has perhaps dropped most dramatically in my affections is Jean-Michel Jarre, largely because I really dug him once. But I still listen to one of his albums with great pleasure: 1984’s Zoolook. This disc sounds as if the…

Fragmentology

An important skill in archaeology is what my friend and mentor Jan Peder Lamm calls fragmentology: the ability to identify objects when all you have is small pieces. The only way to learn this well is to look at a lot of objects. So here’s a fragmentological exercise for you, Dear Reader: of what two…