Archives for December, 2007

The Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm has recently completed a new permanent exhibition about Swedish prehistory. It was planned under the stewardship of the controversial Kristian Berg, a non-archaeologist whose attitude to the museum placed in his care may be summarised as politically expedient, instrumental and post-modernist. I haven’t seen the new exhibition, and…

ScienceBlogs Infiltrates Germany

The German language now has its own ScienceBlogs. Thirteen new SciBlings! I can read them but I can’t write German well enough to take part much. So far they don’t have any archaeologists, but I’ve found a few entries of interest to people with such predilections. Volker at Darwins Erbe (“D’s legacy”) writes about Neanderthals…

Hillforts of Kings and Peasants

Here’s another snippet from my on-going book project. Context: I’ve surveyed the central-place indicators of the Late Roman Period (AD 150-400) in Östergötland, and now I’m moving into the book’s main period of study from AD 400 onward, starting with an evaluation of the Migration Period hillforts. Are they useful for my present king-chasing purposes?…

Science Debate 2008

Dear Reader, according to my server logs, you are likely to live either in the US or in Sweden. Considering the blog neighbourhood I’m in, and the contents of Aard, I believe you care about science. Regardless of party politics, and wherever we all are in the world, I think we can agree that we…

An album I can really recommend is LA quartet OK Go‘s 2005 disc Oh No. It’s catchy, glammy rock with swagger and brains and decadence, recorded in Sweden and beautifully produced by Tore Johansson and the mighty Lindgård/Mopeds brothers. In addition to them kicking ass musically, the band’s lyrics (by Damian Kulash) are unusually poetic…

Bob Lind chalking some apparently quite genuine cupmarks, a ubiquitous type of Bronze Age rock art. Alternative archaeoastronomer Bob Lind (note that I do not call him an unhinged man with crackpot theories) felt himself vindicated this past summer by the Swedish Heritage Board. On a set of new visitors’ signs, the Board didn’t actually…

This 88-page booklet by Åsa Virdi Kroik is named “You’d rather lose your head than turn in your drum”. The title refers to shamanic drums among the Saami. The book is based on an MA thesis in the history of religion defended at the University of Stockholm in 2006. Reading it, I soon realised that…

Anthro Blog Carnival

The twenty-ninth Four Stone Hearth blog carnival is on-line at Remote Central. Archaeology and anthropology gonna be fun, gonna be fun, gonna be fun in de sun! The next open hosting slot is on 27 February. All bloggers with an interest in the subject are welcome to volunteer to me. No need to be an…

Remote Control Metal Detector

Here’s a funny toy: a remote-controlled car with a built-in metal detector. Drive it over a piece of metal and it’ll go BEEP and light up. It doesn’t have anything like serious ground penetration, but still, a cool toy. There are several reasons that metal detecting has not been made into a mechanised remote sensing…

11th Century Reliquary Crucifix

A long-time friend of my parents wrote me a letter recently, telling me that she’d found something unusual in her late mother’s jewellery box. Today I visited her and had a look. It’s a small cast copper-alloy crucifix, darkly patinated, with a semi-obliterated image of the crucified Christ incised onto the front surface. The piece…