Archives for January, 2008

Genes and Peoples

Western European archaeology is largely a humanistic tradition where many scholars have little knowledge of the natural sciences. For instance, I myself haven’t studied natural sciences in any organised way since high school. Still, in my field, I’m known as an unusually science-orientated guy. (Just look at me now, merrily blogging away at Sb.) I…

Cyberpunk Crotch Perspective

My friend Mickey Huss (the virtual lamprey guy) has alerted me to the existence of near-future noir flick Gene Generation. It’s said to be the first Hollywood movie directed by a Singaporean. I haven’t seen it, but I gotta say, that’s the first non-porn movie poster I’ve come across that’s shot from the perspective of…

I had a meeting with my geophysicist buddy Immo Trinks of the National heritage Board the other day, and he showed me an amazing Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey from Borre in Vestfold, Norway. Borre is Norway’s equivalent of Old Uppsala, with a large cemetery with huge barrows. One was obliterated by road workers in 1852,…

Tangled Bank 96 – Toadally

Hey everyone, and welcome to the 96th Tangled Bank blog carnival! This is where you can toadally catch up with the best recent blog writing on the life sciences. Beasties Grrlscientist at Living the Scientific Life explains why bright blue tits make better mothers. Tangled Up In Blue Guy gives us a run-down of the…

Stockholm Blogmeet 8 January

Felicia, Tor, Jesper, Johan, Thinker, Paddy, Kai, Lars, Martin R, Martin C. Photographs by friendly man at nearby table, shoppery by Lars. Our latest Stockholm after-work blogmeet was way back in September. It was high time for another one! Good food, good company, silly jokes. And Paddy K hatched a plan: we’re setting up a…

Turquoise mosaic dragon and bronze bell in rich male burial at Erlitou, phase II, c. 18th century BC. A really good historical source is coeval with the events it describes, or it may even form a part of those events, such as in the case of a land deed. It is written by a knowledgeable…

Canadian newspaper The National Post seems to be subscribing to a blog-buzz service that everybody on Sb got onto a while ago. Therefore, I just got an intriguingly worded letter from Canadian creationist David Johnston (appended below the fold for the edification of the interested Dear Reader). In response to David’s letter, I’ll just say…

In my recent blog entry “Skepticism and Informed Consensus“, I pointed out that a real member of the skeptical movement is not universally skeptical (as may seem evident when you first think of it), but follows scientific consensus. The entry has spun off a lot of side effects: a long supportive reply by Orac, loads…

Rock of Ages

Field archaeology has its perks, one of which is the interaction with the public. Most site visitors are simply full of polite interest. A few tend to be local patriots who wish to reaffirm that their neck of the woods was once enormously important. And then there are those who, well, possess more curiosity than…

The Swedish Skeptics Society (VoF) has just announced its annual awards. The Popular Enlightener for 2007 is none other than my friend Jonathan Lindström, the guy with the Neolithic kids’ book! (I abstained from voting, being heavily biased in his favour.) States the press release, “He receives the award for his pop-sci books where he…