Archives for November, 2008

Lad Lit: Ninjas and Pirates

I’ve taken out a couple of extremely laddish books from the library to read for fun. Seeing constant mentions of ninjas and pirates on the web, I became curious about the historical reality of these matters. So I’ve started on Stephen Turnbull’s Warriors of Medieval Japan (2005) and I’ve got David Cordingly’s Under the Black…

Erich von Däniken: Twilight of the Gods

[More blog entries about archaeology, astronomy, pseudoscience, skepticism, vondäniken; arkeologi, astronomi, pseudovetenskap, skepticism, vondäniken.] In this guest entry, German SciBling Florian Freistetter of Astrodicticum Simplex offers a translation of his report from a recent lecture by a spaced-out visionary. Now if only I could say that I’ve never been fooled by this sort of thing……

Anthro Blog Carnival

The fifty-third Four Stone Hearth blog carnival is on-line at Archaeoporn. Catch the best recent blogging on archaeology and anthropology! Submissions for the next carnival will be sent to me. The next open hosting slot is on 3 December. All bloggers with an interest in the subject are welcome to volunteer to me for hosting.…

Skamby Boat Grave Paper Published

When you’ve finished an archaeological excavation, you always produce an archive report describing the results. Most excavation units these days actually publish their reports in small print runs. If you’re lucky enough to find something really interesting, you should also try to publish it in a journal, anthology or monograph. This is good for you,…

Talks in Lund and Linköping

Next week I’m scheduled to give talks in two venerable Swedish cathedral towns. On Wednesday afternoon the 12th I’ll speak at the Wikipedia Academy Conference in Lund under the heading “Inclusion/exclusion. How obscure subjects can you write about in Wikipedia?”. I’m also gonna talk a little about science outreach, live blogging my research and the…

Royal Medals Copied

A year ago I showed some pictures of particularly cool finds that Claes Pettersson and his team from Jönköping County Museum had made in 17th century urban layers near their offices. One of them was the above clay mould depicting King Gustavus II Adolphus. Claes believes that it may have been used to make candy.…

The Huge Fish

Great images of my childhood are appearing on-line from an unexpected source. My dear Connecticut nanny Lynn Leavey is scanning choice pix from her time with us in Sweden in 1978-79. Here’s my India-goin’, safety-match-pushin’, ABBA-accountin’ grampa Ingemar with a big fish and three small boys on the shore of Lake Lillsjön in Kungsängen west…

Norwegians Grade Archaeology Journals

The other day I took a look at how the European Science Foundation’s ERIH project grades journals in Scandy archaeology. Dear Reader Ismene pointed me to a corresponding list put out by the NDS, “Norwegian Data Support for the Social Sciences”. While ERIH recognises three impact grades plus ungraded journals, the NDS has only two…