Archives for March, 2009

Sättuna Radiocarbon

Last September I directed two weeks of excavations at Sättuna in Kaga, an amazing metal detector site I’ve been working at since 2006. I was hoping to find building foundations from a late-6th century aristocratic manor indicated by the metalwork. But I couldn’t get permission to dig the most promising bit of the site. Instead…

Langobard

On a whim, I’ve grown one of my infrequent beards, and it’s starting to itch. The beard hairs are hard and bristly, and the mustache feels like having the skeleton of a herring glued to my upper lip. Kissing and snuggling my loved ones isn’t at all as nice a usual, since the ‘stache makes…

The Swedish Heritage Board (or, more specifically, my friends Lars and Johan who work there), has begun putting historical photographs whose copyright has expired onto Flickr Commons. Well done! Check it out! The Board is a lot like the Museum of National Antiquities: even though some of its projects just make me want to weep,…

Since a bit more than a year, Fornvännen‘s first 100 years (1906-2005) have been freely available and searchable on-line. It’s a quarterly multi-language research journal mainly about Scandinavian archaeology and Medieval art, and I’m proud to be its managing editor. Now we’ve gone one step further and made the thing into an Open Access journal.…

My buddy Mathias is planning an interesting course at the University of Gothenburg for this autumn: “The IT Society’s Vulnerabilites“. I translate: The goal of the course is to improve understanding of the vulnerability inherent in the central role information technology plays in society. The course offers seminars on the relationship between IT and society.…

Anthro Blog Carnival

The sixty-second Four Stone Hearth blog carnival is on-line at the The Swedish Osteological Society’s Blog. Catch the best recent blogging on archaeology and anthropology from a bony point of view! Submissions for the next carnival will be sent to me. The next open hosting slot is on 22 April. All bloggers with an interest…

Museum Catalogues Ice Cream Stick

A bit of museum silliness with thanks to Dear Reader Kenny. As mentioned before, my dear Museum of National Antiquities has not escaped the weird influence of post-modernist museology. In its excellent on-line catalogue, which I cannot recommend highly enough, we find object number -100:559: an ice cream stick, dating from the ’00s. Its context…

Current Archaeology’s March Issue

Current Archaeology, “the UK’s best selling archaeology magazine”, has kindly given me a complimentary subscription. I recently received my first issue, #228 (March ’09), and I found it an enjoyable read. Best of all, I liked James Barrett’s and Adam Slater’s piece on their recent fieldwork at the Brough of Deerness, Mainland, Orkney. This scenic…

A Riddle of Brass Feet

Here’s a little archaeological riddle I’ve been thinking about. From about 1350 to 1700, three-legged brass cooking pots were common in Sweden. When metal detecting in ploughsoil, you often find bits of them. They’re easily found as the fragments tend to be large and heavy: they make the detector sing loud & clear. But here’s…

By Night He’s One Hell of a Lover

My wife and I watched the 2004 biopic Kinsey last night, about ground-breaking sexologist Alfred Kinsey. Good movie, good acting, interesting theme. And there’s an added perk for fans of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. To the extent that the Kinsey movie has a villain, it’s Alfred Kinsey’s colleague, Thurman Rice. Professor Rice is an…