Archives for September, 2010

Here’s something new in burial archaeology! In 2008 a cremation burial of the Pre-Roman Iron Age was excavated at Skrea backe near Falkenberg in Halland province. It’s unusually rich for its time, being housed in a continental iron-and-bronze cauldron and containing three knives, an awl and 5.3 litres of burnt bones from a lamb, a…

The Glossies Tell Me I’m Not A Man

I’ve felt largely like an outsider since I was a kid, but these days I rarely experience the full force of it except when I visit a news agent’s and confront the glossy magazines. They carry hundreds of titles. And at a pinch I can maybe find one or two that might interest me mildly.…

Weekend Fun

Watched most of the 1984 animated Miyazaki feature film Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind on DVD. Like others of his I’ve seen before, it’s visually stunning and has a pretty pointless story. Sat outdoors and read, probably for the last time this year barring trips south. Went to a friend’s birthday party, helped…

Lazing On A Sunny Afternoon

September unexpectedly turned warm and sunny. I’m a little under the weather and so can’t do anything very energetic. But reading a review copy of a new geology book for the blog in my yard, in the sun, with my dressing gown down around my midriff isn’t too bad. Photo by Junior.

Swedish Populists Want Folksy Art

Immediately after the Swedish election the SD anti-immigration party made a major proclamation advocating policies copied from 1930s Germany – pertaining to the public funding of the arts. Since the end of the war, the driver of a car is no longer known as an Autoführer, “car driver” in German. He’s an Autofahrer, a “car…

Swedish Election Results

Sweden held a general election yesterday, and it did not go the way myself and other lefties would have liked. Parliament has 349 seats, and 175 is thus a majority. Before the election, the various right-wing and centrist parties held 178 seats. Now they hold 192. But the conservative voters have not only become relatively…

Here’s a funny find. My buddy Tobias Bondesson sent me these pics of a gneiss or granite object he’s found, measuring 30 by 28 mm in diameter and 20 mm high. The find spot is near Lee church in northern Jutland (the current stone structure there goes back to shortly after AD 1100), and the…

I’ll be travelling a lot in October and November and giving some talks. Aard readers in the afflicted cities, drop me a line and maybe we can meet up! 16-18 Oct, TAM London. 29-31 Oct, Oslo, Kritisk Masse: speaking about Thor Heyerdahl and other Scandy pseudoarchaeologists. 4 Nov, Uppsala: speaking about pseudoarchaeology. 14 Nov, Norrköping:…

A week ago, the Swedish Research Council’s expert panel for the investigation of suspected science fraud delivered its findings regarding Suchitra Holgersson, professor of transplantation biology in the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg. The panel finds Holgersson, who joined the Academy two years ago, guilty of severe science fraud in several cases where…

Anthro Blog Carnival

The Four Stone Hearth blog carnival lives on without a hitch thanks to Afarensis, its new editor! The one hundred and first instalment is on-line at Sapien Games. Catch the best recent blogging on archaeology and anthropology! Let me remind you, though, that “sapiens” is not a plural.