Archives for December, 2011

Most-played Boardgames of 2011

When a buddy of mine learned that I keep stats on the boardgames I play, she said, “If I didn’t know you, Martin, I’d say you probably suffered from Asperger’s syndrome.” But hey, Boardgamegeek.com has a nifty book-keeping function, and I enjoy keeping notes! Here are the ten games I’ve played the most during 2011,…

Best Reads of 2011

Here are my best reads in English during 2011. I only read 38 books this year (blame the Internet), which is why the really good ones are fewer than usual. Bonk. The curious coupling of sex and science. Mary Roach 2008. A charming look at the history of sex research. The Culture of Fear. Why…

Aard Turns Five

I began blogging at Blogspot a bit more than six years ago. And five years ago to the day, Aard went live here on Sb! Blogging and the interaction with you, Dear Reader, are a continuing source of daily enjoyment to me. But looking at the surroundings, things sure have changed at Sb in five…

My To-Read Pile

I’m spending this week in a semi-vegetative state: sleeping late, taking walks at noon with my wife & kids, eating chocolate, drinking tea, and reading. Here’s my late-2011 selection of reading matter. Svavelvinter. Erik Granström 2004. Swedish fantasy. Proggiga barnböcker – därför blev vi som vi blev. Kalle Lind 2010. About the pinko hippie children’s…

Rediscovering Ancient Landscape Rules

My current project on the siting of Bronze Age sacrificial sites aims to rediscover some of the the period’s landscape rules. In other words, I’m building an heuristic model which might allow archaeologists to search actively for such sites instead of waiting for farmers and drainage workers to find them by chance. I was encouraged…

Boardgame Review: Place

Place is a new Swedish boardgame, the first offering from Spelmakarna i Sverige Ltd who are based near my home. After reading about their product in the local paper, I asked them for a review copy, which they kindly delivered to my doorstep. (No, we’re not acquainted.) It’s a geographical trivia game with five main…

The memory of Herman Lundborg (1868-1943) is insolubly linked to the Swedish State Institute of Eugenics that he headed, and thus lives in infamy. Eugenics was the pseudoscientific belief that human populations deteriorated over time unless care was taken to weed out weak specimens and keep them from procreating. Somehow, these allegedly weak specimens tended…

Take Cover, Yacht Cover Aloft

The Dear Reader may remember that I recently reported from the hibernation grounds of the local yachting club. Here’s a photograph from the same site, taken by my dad. It demonstrates why you might want to weigh the winter cover for your boat down with water tanks like everybody except this one member has.

Six Years Of Blogging

Today is my sixth birthday as a blogger! Normally these days I would use Twitter and Facebook for such a brief message, but it is after all blog-related. Here also are the latest pics of an Aard reader wearing one of the blog t-shirts (order here). Andrew Broome is a culinary engineer based in Palmerston…

As an archaeologist I often need to plot coordinates on maps and plans. At every scale, really: from individual finds on the plan of an excavation trench to the distribution of something across Europe. Just dots of varying shapes and colours on various background maps. Most often, it’s GPS data from field walking and metal…