Archaeology

Category archives for Archaeology

Recent Archaeomags

Skalk 2013:6 (December) has a nice piece about shell middens and Mesolithic oyster cooking, recalling a few points I made back on my first blog. You can’t open a fresh oyster without a steel knife. But if you heat the oyster even just slightly, it opens. I was also interested to learn about a harbour…

The Swedish Higher Education Authority (Universitetskanslersämbetet) has evaluated our basic university programmes in a long series of subjects. The results for archaeology were published yesterday, based on the status 2012. There were 21 BA (3 yrs), Mag.Phil. (4 yrs) and MA (5 yrs) programmes at the country’s archaeology departments. The median grade they’ve received is…

Fornvännen 2013:1, last spring’s issue, is now on-line in its entirety on Open Access. Joy Boutrup et al. on openwork braids of silk and metal thread that decorated 15th century elite fashion garments. Påvel Nicklasson on zoologist and archaeological trailblazer Sven Nilsson’s travels in England and France in 1836. Nils Harnesk on High Medieval log…

I read something annoying; always a good impetus for a blog entry. The offender this time is Nick Saunders of the University of Bristol, writing in Current World Archaeology #62 (Dec/Jan, available on Academia.edu). And the theme is what he calls ”the birth of Modern Conflict Archaeology”. This birth, he explains, began with a 1998…

I Should Blog About Västra Vång

I should blog about the recently announced finds of Romano-Celtic era cult images and Vendel Period gold foil figures at Västra Vång in Blekinge, but I find it kind of boring to act as an archaeological news purveyor. I’ll just refer you to this paper about the first find from the site and say that…

In Current Archaeology #284 (November), Rob Collins has an insightful piece on an intriguing little metal-detector find documented through the Portable Antiquities Scheme. It’s a cast copper-alloy erotic miniature sculptural group, apt to excite both a person’s scholarly and prurient interest. At first glance, frankly, it just looks like a threesome. Once you’ve untangled the…

Fornvännen’s web site has become subsumed into the general document repository of the National Heritage Board. I am not happy about this. But still, we can now offer two new issues on-line for free! So much good research here! Autumn 2012 (no 3): Ludvig Papmehl-Dufay on the first farmers of Öland. Martin Hansson on a…

About the time of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC, Greek writers started to offer lists of Seven Wonders that the well-read traveller should see. In the 2nd century BC the Hanging Gardens of Babylon began to show up on such lists. The location of Babylon is well known: on the River Euphrates…

Thanks to Daniel Lindskog for the tip-off.

23 years ago I started my undergraduate studies, and my hugely inspiring main teacher was Göran Burenhult, who had written our main textbook. Now I’m teaching a very similar freshman archaeology course for the first time, and the main textbook is again one written by Göran Burenhult. This two-volume work is titled Arkeologi i Norden…