Archives for January, 2006

What do you think?

I asked awhile back for some of your thoughts on improving science education, particularly in the U.S. In yesterday’s NY Times, there was a story about discussing one measure that might help in this area: The measure, backed by the Bush administration and expected to pass the House when it returns next month, would provide…

See, it’s posts like this (and many of the comments that follow; hat tip to Mike) that make me worry about “bird flu.” I’m more concerned about the inaccurate information and attacks on those who work in the field (and the effect this may have on public acceptance of real public health advice) than I…

AIDS in the news

Two new big stories regarding AIDS: some good, some bad. First, the good. It’s been reported that a single-pill, once-a-day AIDS treatment may be available by the end of the year. Though the drug regimen to treat AIDS is less oppressive than it was a decade ago, it’s still a difficult and confusing process. Combining…

We’ve been BoingBoinged

Is that even a verb? I know it’s appropriate to say “Slashdotted” and “Farked” and stuff, but I don’t think I’ve ever heard the appropriate term for having a link on boing boing. Anyway, thanks to them for mentioning the Scienceblogs collective on their site, and welcome to folks following their link. Nice to be…

Come to the Midwest—we’re cheap

Well, the cost of living, anyway. Apparently, enough so to draw away even those coast-y people… With East and West Coast residents struggling to cope with high real estate prices and other costs, some are now moving to far less “exciting areas” like that of the Midwest. “Less exciting?” Bah. I hear excitement’s over-rated anyway.…

I’m late to the party, but Chad over at Uncertain Principles put out a call for great experiments/observations in our fields. Like others have said, that’s a tough one, so I thought I’d first run through some of the highlights and big breakthroughs in the fields of microbiology and infectious disease epidemiology that have made…

Check out tonight’s InfidelGuy radio program (airs at 8PM EST) featuring Barbara Forrest. Dr. Barbara Forrest, author of “Creationism’s Trojan Horse” reappears on the program to discuss her thoughts about design, evolution, and the recent court case heard in Dover, Pennsylvania. Dr. Forrest provided key testimony at the trial herself, and we’ll hear first hand…

Microscopic body-snatchers

Carl Zimmer over at The Loom has post discussing Toxoplasma, and how it can affect behavior–and may play a role in the development of schizophrenia. (Check out his post for the details). As Zimmer mentions, this is a controversial hypothesis. Though support is growing for acceptance of the idea that infectious agents can cause all…

Sometimes simple is best

You just never know where the next insight is going to come from. An observation that surfers with cystic fibrosis (a genetic disease that results in mucus build-up in the lungs leading to an increased susceptibility to infection) reported breathing easier after spending time out on the water led researchers to test salt water as…

The virus hunters

Radio Open Source, after a number of requests, has done a program on avian influenza. You can listen to the broadcast here. The guests on the program include: William Karesh Veterinarian Head of the Field Veterinary Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society David Swayne Veterinarian Director of the USDA Southeast Poultry Research Lab Edward Dubovi…