Archives for May, 2006

100 science words

Just in time for college graduations comes a new book, “100 Science words every college graduate should know.” It’s an interesting browse. Others have mentioned it (and Chad even did a pretty nice breakdown of words by discipline); I just thought I’d add my two cents.

While I’m out…

I’m dealing with my own little epidemic (daughter managed to catch the stomach bug that’s been going around her school, meaning she has to miss her last day as a kindergartener, poor thing). I found one post in the queue that I forgot to publish earlier in the month, so today won’t be completely dead.…

You’ve probably seen this floating around the other Seed blogs this week: Since they’re funded by taxpayer dollars (through the NIH, NSF, and so on), should scientists have to justify their research agendas to the public, rather than just grant-making bodies? I’m late to the game, but like others, my answer is “no”–with caveats. Elaboration…

Obesity and your microbes II

Busy today, so sequels are on tap. There’s an interesting story from Nature news that’s a nice follow-up to this recent post on how microbes can influence weight. More after the jump.

In the field II

Leftover from last week’s zoonotic diseases course: I do sometimes get away from the hind end of animals.

Grand Rounds 2.36

A new Grand Rounds is up over at KidneyNotes. Check out what’s happened this week in the medical blogosphere.

Okay, one more…

I was heading out, but first I just want to point y’all over to this excellent post of Janet’s regarding women and “nerd culture”. Now I’m really leaving…

Flu update

As pointed out yesterday, flu blogging has been light this month, even though there have been interesting developments. As such, to catch up a bit, I’m posting an overview of the current Indonesian cluster and some other thoughts below the jump…

Species of the bacterium Clostridium have long been a scourge of humans. They are gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria that can be found in the soil around all of us. The spores then germinate when exposed to anaerobic conditions. Clostridium botulinum is the cause of botulism, a serious and potentially fatal paralytic illness often caused by ingestion…

I write a lot on here about evolution, and more about epidemiology. A recent article in Emerging Infectious Diseases discusses a unique combination of the two: 2,500-year Evolution of the Term Epidemic. I’ve said before that I’m about the farthest thing from a language scholar you can find, but it’s an interesting article tracking how…