Archives for June, 2006

DonorsChoose update

Y’all may have read about this on one of the other participating blogs, but just in case, I’ll recap here: First, what is it? My initial post on it is here; essentially, several of us here at Scienceblogs have put together a wish list of projects at DonorsChoose.org, a non-profit that matches donors with teacher-submitted…

Figures. I’m even mentioned in last week’s “Ask a Scienceblogger” question, and I’m not around to answer it! How is it that all the PIs (Tara, PZ, Orac et al.), various grad students, post-docs, etc. find time to fulfill their primary objectives (day jobs) and blog so prolifically?… Looking at the responses, I think Mark…

Carnival update

Just to update, some carnivals I missed while I was out… Grand Rounds Pediatric Grand Rounds Mendel’s Garden (new genetics carnival) Tangled Bank

Back!

7 days, over 2000 miles, and 32+ hours on the road (half of it with 2 kids and a dog). I need a vacation from my vacation. Thanks to most of you for your patience; I see I’ve already been accused of “censorship” for not being around to approve some comments that got stuck in…

[From the archives; originally posted November 25, 2005] I discussed here new research on venom evolution that topples some old conventional wisdom. It seems this and another study are already making large waves in that field.

Of dragons and microbes

[From the archives; originally posted November 22, 2005] Carl Zimmer has a post today about the work of Dr. Bryan Grieg Fry on the evolution of snake venom. If that name sounds familiar to those of you who aren’t reptile specialists, you may have run across Dr. Fry’s homepage, or you may have seen his…

It’s a small world, after all

[From the archives; originally posted November 28, 2005] Have you ever wondered how Kevin Bacon and the lights of fireflies related to malaria and power grids? I know it’s something that’s kept me up many a sleepless night. One word: interconnections.

[From the archives; originally posted October 20, 2005] Measles is one of those diseases that we don’t give much thought to in the United States anymore. Following an incubation period of about 10 days, flu-like symptoms appear: fever, malaise, cough, congestion, conjunctivitis. Soon, the rash appears, first near the ears, then the forehead, the face,…

Animalcules 1.9

Welcome to the June edition of Animalcules! Apologies for the lateness; I only had a few minutes to get online yesterday, and that was mainly devoted to checking email and making sure there were no crises that needed my attention. So, without further ado… From the Scientific Creative Quarterly comes a humorous entry: Prokaryotes of…

As Janet has surely mentioned by now, we’re kicking off a The ScienceBlogs/DonorsChoose raise-money-to-help-science-classrooms-a-thon! I write a lot on here about science education. Indeed, that’s a big motivator for having this site at all. Science is endlessly fascinating, and it’s a pleasure to have the means to share some of my own love of the…