Archives for May, 2007

I wrote several posts last year on the mumps outbreak here in Iowa. We didn’t get hit with mumps this year, but there has been an ongoing outbreak in Canada, primarily in Nova Scotia. So how do I fit into this?

On HIV vaccines

There were a few comments in the vaccine creation post asking about HIV vaccines. I’ve not had the time to get back to them yet, but in lieu of my response (and since I’m not 100% up-to-date on all the HIV vaccine literature anyway) I’ll offer up a new review from the latest issue of…

I’m in DC again at the American Institute of Biological Sciences meeting, hearing all about evolutionary biology and human health. It’s been busy, but yesterday I ran into fellow sciencebloggers Chris Mooney (who was giving his “Framing science” talk along with Matt Nisbet, who I didn’t have a chance to meet). I also saw Jason…

Readers may have noticed that a re-vamped “Ask a Scienceblogger” has appeared, with prior questions and responses at Cognitive Daily and Thoughts from Kansas. Aetiology gets the current installment, discussing the question, “Why is it possible to create vaccines for some microbes and not others?” First, let me start off with a quibble about how…

YearlyKos science panel update

….or, where I impersonate PZ. As PZ noted last month, he was tapped to moderate the science caucus at YearlyKos, featuring fellow Sciencebloggers Chris Mooney and Ed Brayton, along with Cosmic Variance’s Sean Carroll. However, PZ had to go and get himself some other plans, and I was fortunate enough to be chosen to step…

Canada’s TB legacy

Last month I noted the story of Robert Daniels, a patient with drug-resistant tuberculosis who’s been held in isolation in Arizona in order to prevent spread of the deadly pathogen. While some patient’s rights advocates have been outraged, Mr. Daniels’ treatment pales in comparison to what Mona at Science Notes writes about: News has broken…

I’ve mentioned several times here at Aetiology that, when it comes to pandemic influenza preparedness, we need more than just vaccines specific for H5N1. Though this virus looks like a looming threat right now, we can’t be 100% certain that it will actually cause the next global pandemic; while we’re focused on H5N1, a new…

Carnival barking

I’ve been remiss in linking carnivals lately, but here are a few fresh this week: Tangled Bank #79 at Epigenetics News Pediatric Grand Rounds can be found at The Wait and The Wonder And Grand Rounds is up over at The Blog that Ate Manhattan.

The long shadow of smallpox

Smallpox is, without a doubt, the biggest success story in all of vaccination. The practice of variolation, or the purposeful inoculation of naïve individuals with material from scabs of smallpox victims, was practiced for years prior to Edward Jenner’s substitution of cowpox for the smallpox (Variola) virus. The vaccinia virus, thought to be a derivative…

New blogs!

Busy today and have family visiting from out of town, so I’ll take a few minutes instead to highlight some fairly new blogs. First I’ll note that my friend and colleague over in the Biology department, John Logsdon, has a new blog: Sex, Genes, and Evolution. He’s a real live evolutionary biologist working on a…