Archives for June, 2007

Really, one of these times I’ll get onto a new topic, but every time I turn around, new posts pop up in the scientists and journalists conversation. The most recent updates: Chris Mooney, part II. I want to emphasize a resource he linked: the report from a 2005 workshop on “Science Communications and the News…

More folks weigh in….

Check out new posts on the scientist/journalist (mis?)communication topic at Evolving Thoughts, The Loom, and The Post-Normal Times.

In addition to comments by Mike, Jennifer, and Astroprof, Chris Mooney added his thoughts to the scientist-journalist communication discussion in a post here–so perhaps a few more journalists will pop out of the woodwork there and elaborate. I see a common theme here. Scientists have often had issues with misquotation, and it tends to sour…

It’s that time again. Check out the latest edition of Pediatric Grand Rounds over at Med Journal Watch, while the original version of Grand Rounds can be found this week at code blog: tales of a nurse (set up as a very cute advice column).

I’ve had a busy week (and an especially busy weekend–more on that in a later post), so today’s activity will again be sparse, but I have a lot on tap (now just to get it all typed up!) I do, however, want to highlight a few other posts you should read if you were interested…

As y’all know, a frequent topic of conversation here is communicating science to the public. While many of us do it directly via sites such as this one, the bulk of science writing that the public will read is done by the pros–people writing for the magazines and newspapers, among other outlets. Often, their stories…

Malaria: the cure for AIDS?

Over at The Examining Room of Dr. Charles, the good doc brings up another instance of quackery from an unexpected source: Dr. Henry Heimlich, originator of the Heimlich maneuver for choking. While that procedure has clearly saved many lives, Dr. Heimlich doesn’t stop there–he advocates using his maneuver for drowning victims and asthmatics, neither of…

One of the most famous stories in all of epidemiology revolves around the very birth of the science, in the midst of a London cholera outbreak in 1854. At the time, the scientific community was divided over the cause of cholera and other diseases. The majority of them accepted the miasma theory, the idea that…

Grand Rounds 3.38

I’m on the road today, literally–driving from Iowa to Ohio with kids and dogs in tow. (Well, okay, not exactly in tow–I do allow them to ride *inside* the car). I have a post scheduled for a bit later, but in the meantime, hop on over and check out not one, but two versions of…

It’s been awhile since I picked on the real science journalists (as opposed to we Daily Show-esque “fake news” sites). I don’t mean to get down on them too much; I know that there are many out there who do an incredible job, but then there are also ones who write up articles like this…