Archives for June, 2007

HIV “dissident” David Crowe is like the gift that just keeps on giving. Last year, I mentioned a paper he’d written in the journal Medical Hypotheses, suggesting that influenza serotype H5N1 doesn’t exist. Well, it just keeps getting better. Now, it seems he’s writing a book on “the infectious myth”–like previous commenter jspreen, he’s going…

Death penalty out in Rwanda

Rwanda abolishes the death penalty: Rwanda’s parliament voted late on Friday to abolish the death penalty, a move that should clear the way for suspects in the 1994 genocide to be extradited back to Rwanda. You might think that survivors of such a horrible genocide would want to see those who victimized them put to…

Via Bora, I see that the Koufax awards are back up and running. All of the categories (I think) can be found at this link. Aetiology was nominated in two that I noticed: best series (for the emerging diseases and zoonoses series–now up to 27 posts) and most deserving of wider recognition. Scienceblogs is also…

Good epidemiology resource

I keep saying I’m going to update my blogroll, and really, one of these days I’ll get to it. In the meantime, I’ll keep highlighting a few of the sites that I’ll be adding. One of these is Epidemiologic Inquiry, kind of one-stop-shopping for epidemiologists. The site includes updates on epi and research matters and…

I previously mentioned Sierra Leone when discussing the effect of warfare on the emergence of disease. Sierra Leone has long been a country divided, and suffered through more than a decade of civil war (1991-2002) and decades of instability prior to that. Since the end of the war, changes have happened, but slowly. Most recently,…

Well, this is a new low…

Well, this is a new low. I ran across this blog post from a few months back, discussing the Imus situation: Anytime a person is negatively labeled because of gender or race, this affronts our shared human dignity. And we should be especially careful here, for this has not always been such an obvious evil.…

My office in the epidemiology department is located within the hospital. Therefore, every day when I walk into work, I pass by a sign like the one on the left. Like most states, Iowa has a safe haven law–a law that allows parents to leave a newborn infant at a designated site, no questions asked,…

New blog carnivals available

Check out the latest editions of: Pediatric Grand Rounds Grand Rounds Tangled Bank

DNA, schmeNA

Over at her old blog, Karmen had a nice overview of Deinococcus radiodurans, a fascinating organism that’s able to withstand many different extremes: genotoxic chemicals, oxidative damage, high levels of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation, dehydration, and, as the name suggests, incredibly high doses of radiation. (We’re talking high–up to 5,000 Gy without breaking a sweat,…

Time journalist (and newly minted Nieman fellow in global health) Christine Gorman recently gave a talk at the Global Health Council’s annual meeting. Christine discussed topics that get a lot of press–such as HIV/AIDS–and others that occasionally bubble up to the surface, such as malaria and non-infectious global health issues like female genital mutilation. However,…