Archives for October, 2007

Germs….in…..SPACE!

Salmonella species are frequent human pathogens. An incredibly diverse genus, different types of Salmonella infect an enormous variety of species, from mammals to fish to invertebrates. They are typically acquired via ingestion of contaminated food or water, and the bacteria then seed the intestine and replicate there. These gram-negative organisms are the cause of typhoid…

I’ll be hosting the latest edition of Pediatric Grand Rounds here this coming Sunday. Send along submissions dealing with any aspect of children’s health to me by Saturday evening for inclusion.

DonorsChoose 2007–final call!

Edited to add: we’ve reached our goal! Thank you so much to all who participated; if others would still like to donate, Janet has a list of other blogger challenges–and remember that every completed challenge gets a 10% completion bonus from DonorsChoose, stretching your donation farther. Finally, donors–don’t forget to register for prizes! The Scienceblogs…

For those of you who might not brave the comments threads on any HIV post, you may have missed this tidbit of information. I’ve written about “investigative journalist” Liam Scheff previously; he’s an HIV “dissident” and author of a story from a few years back titled “The House that AIDS Built”. In this, he claimed…

It’s only taken 30 years, but information about Ebola in nature is finally starting to snowball. First, after almost 15 years of disappearing from the human population, Ebola returned with a vengeance in the mid 1990s, causing illness in 6 separate outbreaks in Gabon, Ivory Coast, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and South Africa (imported…

A perfect winter storm developing?

A few news stories hit my inbox all at once yesterday–and the combination of them doesn’t bode well for childrens’ health; more after the jump.

DonorsChoose: over the halfway mark

The DonorsChoose drive here at ScienceBlogs is just over halfway finished. My challenge is almost 50% funded, with $952 raised so far as I write this and donations from 10 of you out there (and thank you very much for that). There’s still quite a ways to go, however, and many incentives to get there.…

Busy day here, but I do have a brief post up on MRSA over at Correlations if you’re looking for some reading material. [Edited to add: Mike has a lot more new MRSA stuff here; well worth reading!]

Revere weighs in

Revere weighs in regarding the Ferrell case. He also mentions one ironic point regarding bioterrorism history and one of the bacteria used, Serretia marcescens, that I hadn’t thought to mention.

Mail harmless bacteria, go to jail

Being a microbiologist can be a dangerous business. Some of us work out in the field, exposed to weather, animals, and pathogens of all different forms. Some do research in countries with unstable governments, collecting samples and tracking down infected individuals in the midst of strife, poverty, and warfare. Some remain in the lab, but…