Archives for October, 2007

New in the news

A few stories elsewhere on vaccines, zoonotic disease, a new Gates initiative, and the environment that deserve your attention:

Women are still chattel. Film at 11.

I don’t even have to comment on this article from the LA Times about a new major in homemaking (for women only, of course) at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. So much in the article speaks for itself. Painful excerpts below:

A reader passed along a link to this post on Short memories: AIDS denialism and vaccine resistance. The author learned that a friend had dated an AIDS denialist:

Monday’s post highlighting a few of the DonorsChoose projects brought in a few more donations, so check out another round of teacher-initiated projects, and throw in a few dollars if you’re able (or more than a few–I still have almost $1700 to go to reach my goal, or even another $900 to reach the total…

Help out a fellow science blogger!

Science blogger Shelley Batts of Retrospectacle is once again in the running for a nice chunk of change via the 2007 blogging scholarship. She’s one of 20 finalists, and as things stand, it’s a close race (and to be honest, some of her closest challengers are just pretty lame). So she’d very much appreciate it…

Update on Tasmanian Devil cancer

Following a new PNAS paper regarding the strange facial cancers in Tasmanian devils, I have a post on the topic up over at Correlations. (Be sure to check out the Correlations homepage too!)

More nasty flies

If you thought botflies were bad, check out Bug Girl’s post on tumbu flies. The adult flies lay their eggs on wet laundry hanging out to dry, or in the soil or sand. Within two days, larvae hatch, and can remain alive for up to two weeks. During that time, if they come into contact…

That’s the thrust of an interesting editorial in Nature Medicine: what would you do if you could publish only 20 papers throughout your career? And how would it affect research productivity, scientific publishing, tenure review, and a host of other issues? More after the jump…

DonorsChoose–week 2

I’ve been remiss at soliciting more funding for the Scienceblogs DonorsChoose challenge. All told, Sciencebloggers have raised over $12,000 total so far to fund teacher-initiated, citizen-funded projects–$175 of that from here at Aetiology thus far, so I have a bit of catching up to do. I know you’re all busy people, so I’ll save you…

Correlations is live

I mentioned a new blogging project I’m involved with last week–a group blog called Correlations in conjunction with PBS and WIRED magazine. Well, now it’s up and running, so take a minute to poke around and read more about my other co-bloggers. Just intro posts are up for now, but “real” content will be coming…