Archives for February, 2008

Thar’s bacteria in that there snow!

I really need more time to fill in a gap in my microbiology education: environmental microbiology. I run across papers all the time that are absolutely fascinating, and wish I had a free year to just take some additional coursework in this area. For instance, a paper in today’s Science magazine discusses how atmospheric bacteria…

A note of thanks

Just wanted to say how appreciative I am to those of you who took the time to read and/or comment on this week’s guest posts from my students. Though a few of them did take part in the comments section (something I didn’t require), I know that they were all following along and appreciated the…

This is the sixth of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. By Ousmane Diallo I was dumbfounded when I read this news article relating HPV to the increase of lip and oral cancers because of oral sex. It reminded me my younger years, as a med student, debating with my professor of…

This is the fifth of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. By Rachel Kirby There are about 500,000 (or approx 1 in 544 people) in the United States who suffer from Crohn’s disease, and is most prevalent in both men and women between the ages of 20-30. Crohn’s Disease is an autoimmune…

Bora grills me

As part of his ongoing series of interviews following the 2007 Science blogging conference, Bora today has his Q&A with yours truly.

This is the fourth of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. By David Massaquoi Working in public health is an interesting and satisfying job. Adding infectious disease investigation to such task makes the job not only difficult but the challenges of encountering numerous disease conditions; including learning about the Morgellon’s disease. In…

This is the third of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. By Whitney Baker While working out at the gym last night, I was perusing the latest SHAPE magazine to help pass the time. In it, I read a small article about researchers finding an association between Adenovirus-36 and human obesity. Since…

This is the second of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. By Courtney Cook Scientists have been aware of a relationship between infections and mental illnesses for quite some time. For example, during the 1918 influenza pandemic, some patients were seen to exhibit a delirium unlike that which had typically been associated…

This is the first of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. by Matthew Fitzgerald Viruses cause cancer? Cancer researchers have for decades known that viruses can cause cancer. It is now estimated that 15% of the world’s cancers are caused by infectious diseases including viruses. Some of these include: Human Papilloma Virus…

Introducing…

…my grad students. My spring semester course is on infectious causes of chronic disease, looking at the role various infections play in cancer, autoimmune disease, mental illness, and other chronic conditions. Since I’ve often discussed the importance of having scientists communicate with the public, I decided to assign each of them to write 2 blog…