For the jump haters…

Thomas asks in the comments:

“More after the jump…” WTF? Why must people insist on using this trite, meaningless phrase? Don’t they know it immediately makes people hate them for using it? I’m pretty sure people know how to scroll down to see if the article continues. And when all that “jump” is is a double-spaced line… WFT!?

I’m not a big fan of this phrase either, but I started using it after talking with readers who 1) came in from the home page and it wasn’t always clear from the portion of the post appearing there if there was additional text at the link; and 2) read via RSS feed and would only click through if it was also obvious there was more to read that way. I realize, though, that it makes it a bit awkward for readers coming in via a link from the Sb home page or elsewhere, though–so I’m certainly open to any suggestions.

Comments

  1. #1 Coturnix
    July 25, 2008

    Would “under the fold” feel any different? That is the phrase I usually use, and sometimes I say “Read more:”

  2. #2 JScarry
    July 25, 2008

    I appreciate it. I use an RSS reader and would not read the entire article if it seemed complete before the jump.

  3. #3 Jeb, FCD
    July 25, 2008

    I hate it too, but it is nice to know that there is more. I access ScienceBlogs from an RSS feed most of the time. But “After the jump” is so damn cliche/old/irritating. Users do need to know if there is more, especially if the bit on the RSS seems to stand alone.

    I’d settle for a “Continued…” or something.

  4. #4 Coturnix
    July 25, 2008

    Sometimes a colon in place of a period is sufficient hint….

  5. #5 chezjake
    July 25, 2008

    Short and simple does the trick. “More” or “Read on” would do the job.

  6. #6 Left_Wing_Fox
    July 25, 2008

    I guess it depends on how much faith you’re willing to put in the “Read on” button on your main page. Here at Scienceblogs, that “More after the jump” appears superfluous on this blog, which excerpts the post differently depending on whether you are reading it from the “Last 24 Hours” summary, your blog’s main page, or an RSS reader. Only readers reading from your main page would see the phrase as intended, and all others would be placed superfluously, or cut off completely.

    Interestingly one page I visit displays ads right after the initial paragraphs, so “More after the Jump” is referring both the the change of page, but also to the advertisement in the format of the story. I think there its appropriate.

    Strikes me as a rather overblown quibble, honestly.

  7. #7 arby
    July 25, 2008

    I don’t care what phrase you use. I would just like to see the whole post in the feed, if I want to see comments I can click through, although it is often so fresh there are no comments yet. I tend to get a little pissy when there is just a tease, a cute line or two, and I seldom click through on those. This post, and this blog, are fine. Don’t worry about the words when you do truncate it in the feed, just give us a good start at the gist of the post. chezjake is right, “more” would be just fine. rb

  8. #8 Left_Wing_Fox
    July 25, 2008

    Speaking of superfluous; GAH! I need to use that “preview” button more…

  9. #9 Jason Creighton
    July 25, 2008

    I think that the simple “Read On” link that you have is sufficient. Although I normally read using an RSS reader, my personal preference would be to have the entire article in the feed, without any need to click through to see the rest.

  10. #11 decrepitoldfool
    July 25, 2008

    “Below the fold” is standard newspaper terminology that leaked into web design. It doesn’t matter to me if you say; “after the lettuce” as long as it’s a link I can use to continue. I try to be irritated by more substantive things than that.

    Splitting posts makes the whole blog easier to scan. And when I go through RSS feeds, I always click through to posts that interest me anyway, since finding out that (please correct if wrong) the author is paid by the visit.

  11. #12 Matt Hussein Platte
    July 26, 2008

    It’s part of what makes English English. Use it.

  12. #13 N
    July 26, 2008

    Another RSS reader here–“after the jump” works great and is very much appreciated. “After the lettuce” works too I suppose

  13. #14 Gary
    July 26, 2008

    I’m surprised it bothers anyone. In fact, I can’t really see a better way of doing it.

    See the rest of my comment after the jump…

  14. #15 Antonio
    July 26, 2008

    I don’t think it’s necessary but it doesn’t do me any harm. I think you should be creative and think of something different every time ;)

    Btw, I <3 your blog!

  15. #16 Raphael
    July 27, 2008

    “I’m pretty sure people know how to scroll down to see if the article continues. And when all that “jump” is is a double-spaced line… WFT!?”

    To me, that part sounds as if Thomas has just seen the permalink versions of individual posts with “after the jump” in them, and is too dumb to realise that “the jump” looks differently from the blog’s main page. Don’t you just love it when people show off their stupidity and complete in a particularly obnoxious way?

  16. #17 Citizen
    July 27, 2008

    Yeah, they think they’re so great with this “after the jump” nonsense. What about, “After my smoke?”

    http://www.repealthesmokingban.org

    REPEALTHESMOKINGBAN DOT ORG

  17. #18 wright
    July 27, 2008

    Thomas has too much spare time if this kind of thing upsets him. I appreciate a reminder that there is more than a couple of header paragraphs, and just what form that takes is trivial.

  18. #19 Dustin
    July 27, 2008

    I realize, though, that it makes it a bit awkward for readers coming in via a link from the Sb home page or elsewhere, though–so I’m certainly open to any suggestions.

    You are a very nice person. I would suggest giving the whiners something real to complain about.

    And thank you, Citizen, for that link, even if it was a little OT.

  19. #20 NM
    July 27, 2008

    I care so much about this ‘issue’ that I’m going to …. meh….

  20. #21 zhasper
    July 28, 2008

    2) read via RSS feed and would only click through if it was also obvious there was more to read that way.

    that, right there, is my problem. Having to jump out of a reader and onto the site is very jarring – it almost guarantees that I’m not going to read the rest of the article. To be worth the effort of clicking that link, opening a new tab, reading it, jumping back to gReader… well, the opening part better be the most exciting thing I’ve read in the last hour, or I’m not going to bother.

    Whether you consider that a problem or not is up to you. Perhaps it means that you can trust visitor numbers to the site to be only people who are interested in reading the article.

    It doesn’t gain me anything though. I’d still be just as likely to read the feed even if the same percentage of articles were skipped at the same place as you put the jump – me manually jumping to the next article just involves pressing j, which already has my finger resting on it from jumping down to your article.

    So, in summary:

    A) For articles that catch my interest in the first paragraph or two – it significantly annoys me that I’d have to leave my feed reader to read the rest, and makes it less likely that I’m going to bother.
    B) For articles that don’t catch my interest, it doesn’t get in my way, but it doesn’t give me any benefit either
    C) Your view on which of those things is good and bad is probably different to mine
    D) I’m probably not a typical reader. I’m rarely typical at anything.

  21. #22 mph
    July 28, 2008

    The best solution is technical: The site should suppress the “after the jump” message on pages where the whole article is shown. It should only appear in the RSS feed, the “front page”, etc.

  22. #23 Kalia's little brother
    July 31, 2008

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    October 20, 2008

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