Archives for May, 2011

I wasn’t going to raise this comment en blogge, but with Dr. Isis’ new post, it becomes more relevant. From Rick Fletcher on the “you’re too pretty” post: It’s a major issue if your department won’t hire your or promote you because you are a woman. It’s no surprise that a retail clerk at a…

In the United States, we tend to take our clean drinking water for granted. Even though there are periodic concerns which bubble up about pharmaceuticals or other chemicals in our water supply, we typically believe–with good reason–that we have little to fear when it comes to contamination from microbes. Our drinking water, while far from…

Measles in Iowa

We’ve had pertussis and mumps, so it was only a matter of time. State health officials declared a “public health emergency” Tuesday after a test confirmed a case of measles in an unvaccinated Dallas County baby who apparently picked up the disease in India. They said people who might have been exposed included passengers on…

This wasn’t the post I wanted to write about the ASM conference. There’s been lots of great science discussed (I’ve tried to tweet some of it, but the wifi in both the conference center and my hotel have been spotty, so I’ve not had a chance to write anything comprehensive). Instead, I’m ticked off and…

ASM in the Big Easy

The American Society for Microbiology General Meeting started yesterday in New Orleans. Not sure how much time I’ll have to write it up (plus the wifi wasn’t functioning yesterday at the conference center), but you can follow along on Twitter (hashtag #asm2011). Full day tomorrow, and I saw at least 5 more MRSA/food studies in…

Ebola has long been associated with wildlife. From the early days, bats were viewed as a potential reservoir (though it wasn’t confirmed that they actually harbored the virus until 2005). Contact with wild animals–particularly primates which were butchered for food–was also long thought to be a risk factor, and now we know that primates can…

Via H5N1 and other sources, there’s at least one new Ebola case in Uganda: The rare and deadly Ebola virus has killed a 12-year-old Ugandan girl and health officials said on Saturday they expected more cases. The girl from Luwero district, 75 km (45 miles) north of the capital Kampala, died on May 6, said…

MRSA, Meat, and Motown

It’s been not even a month since the last paper looking at MRSA in meat, and up pops another one. So far here in the US, we’ve seen studies in Rhode Island (no MRSA found); Louisiana (MRSA found in beef and pork, but “human” types: USA100 and USA300); the recent Waters et al study sampling…

MRSA and bedbugs?

An ahead-of-print paper in Emerging Infectious Diseases is generating some buzz in the mainstream media. While the findings are interesting, I’m honestly not sure how they got published, being so preliminary. Like many areas, Vancouver, British Columbia has seen a jump in the prevalence of bedbugs. After finding impoverished patients infested with the bugs, researchers…

Maryn McKenna was awesome enough to take some time out of her vacation to blog about our recent ST398 paper, finding “livestock-associated” S. aureus in a daycare worker. She raised one question I didn’t really address previously, regarding our participation by kids and workers at the facility (eight kids out of 168, and 24 out…