Cancer epidemiology

Category archives for Cancer epidemiology

Student guest post by Anh To. When I found out my only non-smoking cousin had nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), I was puzzled. With all the hype about cigarette smoking associated with various kinds of cancers in the media, I did not understand why none of my smoking cousins had NPC but the one who didn’t smoke…

Helicobacter pylori is, by bacteriological standards, a relative newcomer to medicine. Although its pathogenesis has been studied for only about the past 20 years, there are reports from as far back as the late 19th century of small, helical bacteria in the stomachs of some patients. Largely these anecdotal reports were relegated to the “hmm,…

This is the third of 6 guest posts on infection and chronic disease. Does chronic IL-6 levels lead to epigenetic changes in DNA methylation that contribute to this pathway? By Matthew Fitzgerald How can infection be a carcinogen? How do infectious diseases lead to cancer, if at all, is still a highly debated area of…

It’s just not been Vegas’ week. First a ricin-laced hotel room, then a clinic-associated outbreak of hepatitis C virus (and potentially hepatitis B and HIV) that could become enormous. Meanwhile, an outbreak of hepatitis E is raging in Uganda. So what are these virues, and how in the world could a medical catastrophe of this…

This is the sixth of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. By Ousmane Diallo I was dumbfounded when I read this news article relating HPV to the increase of lip and oral cancers because of oral sex. It reminded me my younger years, as a med student, debating with my professor of…

This is the first of 6 guest posts on infectious causes of chronic disease. by Matthew Fitzgerald Viruses cause cancer? Cancer researchers have for decades known that viruses can cause cancer. It is now estimated that 15% of the world’s cancers are caused by infectious diseases including viruses. Some of these include: Human Papilloma Virus…

Help save the Tasmanian devil

Last month, I wrote an update on the strange cancer affecting Tasmanian devils–a tumor cell that’s taken on a life of its own, and is spreading through the population as the animals fight. Now, via PZ comes something you can do to help–donate and help to save this species: Help the Tasmanian devil with 6…

Update on Tasmanian Devil cancer

Following a new PNAS paper regarding the strange facial cancers in Tasmanian devils, I have a post on the topic up over at Correlations. (Be sure to check out the Correlations homepage too!)

The perils of being a night owl

Last year, I mentioned some ongoing research suggesting a link between exposure to light and the development of breast cancer. As I mentioned then: While we know a good deal about factors that can contribute to breast cancer risk–including genetics (such as mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes) and lifestyle choices (late or no…

Duesberg on cancer, deconstructed

A few readers have asked me what I thought about HIV “dissident” Peter Duesberg’s recent article in Scientific American, entitled Chromosomal Chaos and Cancer. Duesberg’s cancer ideas–and his claim of novelty for researching how chromosomal abnormalities, rather than more simpler gene mutations, cause cancer–are something I wanted to write about months ago, after I came…