Doing Science

Category archives for Doing Science

This week at #scio14, Danielle Lee is leading a discussion on privilege in science. I’d started this post and abandoned it a few weeks back, but I think it speaks to a similar phenomenon as she describes in her post. Low-income students are being lost not only to science, but often to the college experience…

While I loved Jeanne Garbarino’s recent post, “Want to promote women in STEM? Leave home life out of the discussion“, and agree with probably 90% of it, I think it unfortunately goes from one extreme to another with some of her recommendations. Garbarino notes several reasons why she thinks it’s counter-productive to discuss home life…

I have written and deleted this post. Twice. But damn it, it needs to be said. I’m here in charming Montreal for the North American Congress of Epidemiology. It’s a good-sized meeting, as far as epi meetings go. The site notes that it’s a joint effort between four major Epi organizations: The American College of…

In the lab–the year in review

Ah, classes are finally over. The last two summers I’ve taught a short, intense course in Applied Infectious Disease Epidemiology, condensing a semester’s worth of work into a week. It’s a fun course to teach, but exhausting–after teaching, I head back home or to the office to finish last-minute preparation for the next day’s talks…

This wasn’t the post I wanted to write about the ASM conference. There’s been lots of great science discussed (I’ve tried to tweet some of it, but the wifi in both the conference center and my hotel have been spotty, so I’ve not had a chance to write anything comprehensive). Instead, I’m ticked off and…

Maryn McKenna was awesome enough to take some time out of her vacation to blog about our recent ST398 paper, finding “livestock-associated” S. aureus in a daycare worker. She raised one question I didn’t really address previously, regarding our participation by kids and workers at the facility (eight kids out of 168, and 24 out…

The second edition of the Rock Stars of Science is now out online, and in the November 23rd (“Men of the Year”) edition of GQ magazine. As Chris Mooney notes, this is a campaign funded by the Geoffery Beene Foundation, working to raise recognition of scientists’ work (and scientists, period, since roughly half of the…

Women and Veterinary Medicine

The Dog Zombie has an interesting post discussing women in vet med–and why there are so many. She notes that her school is only 12% male, versus more of an even distribution in med schools, and the recent discussion of gender imbalance in science blogging. This is interesting to me, as my personal vet is…

Interesting discussion over at The Spandrel Shop and Cackle of Rad on doing field work in the sciences–and the potential dangers that might be encountered. Now, Prof-like Substance and Cackle of Rad are discussing field work along the lines of biological sample collection, sometimes in the middle of nowhere, which isn’t something I’ve ever done.…