Politics

Category archives for Politics

Death penalty out in Rwanda

Rwanda abolishes the death penalty: Rwanda’s parliament voted late on Friday to abolish the death penalty, a move that should clear the way for suspects in the 1994 genocide to be extradited back to Rwanda. You might think that survivors of such a horrible genocide would want to see those who victimized them put to…

I previously mentioned Sierra Leone when discussing the effect of warfare on the emergence of disease. Sierra Leone has long been a country divided, and suffered through more than a decade of civil war (1991-2002) and decades of instability prior to that. Since the end of the war, changes have happened, but slowly. Most recently,…

Well, this is a new low…

Well, this is a new low. I ran across this blog post from a few months back, discussing the Imus situation: Anytime a person is negatively labeled because of gender or race, this affronts our shared human dignity. And we should be especially careful here, for this has not always been such an obvious evil.…

Waxing indignant: pointless?

In the comments to the XDR-TB update post, Scott suggested that bloggers were putting too much emphasis on whether the TB patient was stupid/arrogant/self-centered/whatever, and later that “waxing indignant is pointless.” I started this as a response to those comments, but thought instead it might be an interesting conversation–is it pointless? Certainly indignation about this…

I blogged earlier about the Georgia man who globe-trotted while infected with XDR-TB. I wrote that post late Tuesday evening, and since then, a number of other details about his case have come to light–and they’re not encouraging. In fact, this serves as a nice example of a convergence of a number of areas I’ve…

Waiting for antivirals

A long time ago, in a galaxy far far away, I reviewed the HIV/AIDS chapter in Tom Bethell’s book, “The Politically Incorrect Guide to Science.” I discussed his characterization of AIDS in Africa: As the chapter title suggests, Bethell claims that AIDS in Africa is a made-up epidemic; AIDS is really due to simple malnutrition…

YearlyKos science panel update

….or, where I impersonate PZ. As PZ noted last month, he was tapped to moderate the science caucus at YearlyKos, featuring fellow Sciencebloggers Chris Mooney and Ed Brayton, along with Cosmic Variance’s Sean Carroll. However, PZ had to go and get himself some other plans, and I was fortunate enough to be chosen to step…

I wrote a post back in February about HIV’s “Kitzmiller vs. Dover” trial. The trial was appealing the sentence of one Andre Chad Parenzee, a native of South Africa who’d been convicted in Australia back in 2004 of infecting one woman with HIV (and exposing two others). Parenzee knew of his HIV+ status, telling the…

Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is as old as civilization. The bacterium infects approximately a third of the world’s population–roughly 2 billion individuals. It’s estimated that 8 million new cases are contracted each year–around a new infection every second. ~2 million individuals die as a result of TB every year. The bacterium also plays a prominent role…

The most recent edition of Tangled Bank, your one-stop science blogging carnival, is up over at Living the Scientific Life. In addition, there are a few other posts I’ve been meaning to plug: Nick on Texas House overturning mandatory HPV vaccination. Burt at Panda’s Thumb on Why you should care if cattle get fourth-generation cephalosporins…