Angry Toxicologist

You’ve probably heard that a F/A-18D jet crashed in San Diego on approach to Miramar, killing 3 on the ground (the pilot ejected and is fine). A lot of the news reports noted that ~20 homes were evacuated due to ‘toxic chemicals’. What sort of chemicals would you be worried about?

First Responders and Bystanders

Beyond the physical hazards (things under pressure like hydraulics, O2 canisters,…etc), there’s all kinds of stuff to worry about like fuel, oils, hydraulic fluids, beryllium, lithium, chromium, mercury, and possibly radioactive compounds. But the biggest hazard is simply the burning of Advanced Composite Materials (ACM). According to the military, aircraft can contain anywhere from about 175-33,000 lbs of ACM. Upon burning, a lot of these Advanced Composite Materials release lots of carbon monoxide (obviously), nitrous oxides, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen cyanide. An air craft explosion could produce these chemicals above levels that would kill you in short order as long as the temp was above 300 deg F. The F-18 has a lot of Graphite-epoxy ACM which is probably better short term than if an Apache helicopter crashed due to the kevlar/graphite-epoxy used on that aircraft. So, in short, you’re most worried about death from CO or cyanide poisoning. After that you’d worry about the more exotic stuff, but it’s not likely that you’d be exposed to this junk after the crash so it’s not as big of a concern.

Clean-up crew

The Clean-up crew would have to think about all the exotic chemicals abounding but would not have to worry so much about the CO/NO/SO/CN issues. They would, however, have to worry about all the respirable fibers that may be floating around due to the ACM. Particularly troubling are the boron-epoxies since they are able to penetrate protection to some degree. These fibers cause long-lasting harm if inhaled in sufficient amounts.

Bonus explainer: How do you respond to an aviation crash?

If we’re talking about you the citizen, the answer is to stay inside, close all windows, doors or other air intakes and wait for instruction. If you’re talking about the responders, they evacuate the area around the crash and smoke plume, and cool the crash site down while trying not to break apart the plane further with high pressure. They do not use aircraft (such as helicopters) around a crash because it disperses the chemicals downward and in an unpredictable manner. Once they’ve identified the immediate hazards (always using proper industrial hygiene, of course), they spray a fixicant like acrylic floor wax over the crash to keep fibers and chemicals where they are.

Comments

  1. #1 Darkhorse
    December 9, 2008

    Acrylic floor wax? I always love finding out that people do super techincal stuff with something bought at home depot. It makes sense; it’s just hilarious.

  2. #2 kemibe
    December 9, 2008

    “…would kill you in short order as long as the temp was above 300 deg F.”

    Why is this? Because more of the potentially lethal compounds would be vaporized and therefore subject to inhalation?

    Also, I never would have guessed carbon dioxide had the ability to kill people in an open space, or by simply wafting into their homes (in which case the home is by definition an open space of sorts). I’ve been conditioned by knowing only of CO fatalities that have either been intentional (in someone’s garage) or incidental in a closed house (a leak the resident never knew about).

  3. #3 AngryToxicologist
    December 9, 2008

    Above 300 deg is around what you’d have to be at to produce enough of the gasses to harm someone at the site itself. So you’re right but it’s both production than volitization.

    As to the CO, you’re right in the ways that people commonly die from it but even in those cases the levels don’t have to be that high. 500 ppm can kill you and depending on what type of heat source it is, the CO levels will far exceed that (5,000 ppm will probably kill you pretty fast).

    But it’s really the combination with CN that’s particularly leathal. This is because 1) CN is potent and 2) they both effect cellular respiration so the toxicity is synergistic, not just additive (CO by making oxygen unavailable to the cells, and CN by not allowing electron transfer to oxygen, thereby shutting down aerobic respiration).

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    January 1, 2009

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    February 15, 2009

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    February 15, 2009

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    March 18, 2009

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    March 31, 2009

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  9. #9 sac ekimi
    April 25, 2009

    So, in short, you’re most worried about death from CO or cyanide poisoning. After that you’d worry about the more exotic stuff, but it’s not likely that you’d be exposed to this junk after the crash so it’s not as big of a concern.

  10. #10 mp3 shqip
    August 29, 2009

    Is it really that much toxication? Video Shqip

  11. #11 Abercrombie
    November 30, 2009

    But it’s really the combination with CN that’s particularly leathal. This is because 1) CN is potent and 2) they both effect cellular respiration so the toxicity is synergistic, not just additive (CO by making oxygen unavailable to the cells, and CN by not allowing electron transfer to oxygen, thereby shutting down aerobic respiration).

  12. #12 GENC
    December 6, 2009

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  13. #13 TV Shqip
    February 22, 2010

    I dont think that was so much toxication ! TV Shqip

  14. #14 houston chiropractor
    March 21, 2011

    Above 300 deg is around what you’d have to be at to produce enough of the gasses to harm someone at the site itself. So you’re right but it’s both production than volitization.

  15. #15 adana oto kiralama
    October 26, 2011

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