Applied Statistics

Bye

I realize that I haven’t been posting much here. We had some plans to use the Applied Statistics blog for other purposes but it didn’t really work out, so from now on you can go to my main blog for your statistical entertainment.

I’ve been told that it’s zombie day, so I thought I’d link to this research article by Gelman and Romero: The zombie menace has so far been studied only qualitatively or through the use of mathematical models without empirical content. We propose to use a new tool in survey research to allow zombies to be…

Maggie Fox writes: Brain scans may be able to predict what you will do better than you can yourself . . . They found a way to interpret “real time” brain images to show whether people who viewed messages about using sunscreen would actually use sunscreen during the following week. The scans were more accurate…

See discussion here. I’ve linked to it from here because ScienceBlogger and investigative journalist Tim Lambert has written some on the topic.

Random matrices in the news

Mark Buchanan wrote a cover article for the New Scientist on random matrices, a heretofore obscure area of probability theory that his headline writer characterizes as “the deep law that shapes our reality.” It’s interesting stuff, and he gets into some statistical applications at the end, so I’ll give you my take on it. But…

Felix Salmon comments on a report that econ czar Larry Summers is likely to be leaving the government: But if it’s true, where is he leaving to? . . . “Wall Street consulting” is probably a polite way of saying “a return to DE Shaw”, which happily paid Larry $5 million for one year of…

Conservatives for Hillary?

John discusses an argument by Bruce Bartlett that it made sense for conservatives to support Hillary Clinton in 2008, based on the following reasoning: Surveying the political landscape, I [Barttlett] didn’t think the Republican candidate, whoever it might be, was very likely to win against whoever the Democratic candidate might be. Therefore I concluded that…

Sociologists Dalton Conley and Emily Rauscher claim: Using nationally-representative data from the [1994] General Social Survey, we [Conley and Rauscher] find that female offspring induce more conservative political identification. We hypothesize that this results from the change in reproductive fitness strategy that daughters may evince. But economists Andrew Oswald and Nattavudh Powdthavee have found the…

A few months ago, Yu-Sung and I summarized some survey results from the 1993-1996 General Social Survey. 56% of respondents said they attended an amateur or professional sports event” during the past twelve months, and it turned out that they were quite a bit more Republican than other Americans but not much different in their…

Our story begins with this article by Sanjay Kaul and George Diamond: The randomized controlled clinical trial is the gold standard scientific method for the evaluation of diagnostic and treatment interventions. Such trials are cited frequently as the authoritative foundation for evidence-based management policies. Nevertheless, they have a number of limitations that challenge the interpretation…