bioephemera

Archives for March, 2009

Jacek Utko argues that there is no convincing reason why newspapers should survive – but that good design might be able to transform them into something more successful. In addition to numerous awards, Utko’s fearless use of white space, bold color, and dramatic imagery has won significant increases in readership (up to 100%) for several…

My friend John Ohab is hosting a new DoD webcast called “Armed With Science.” Sure, it has an over-the-top logo reminiscent of the Syfy Channel (I like to intone “ARMED WITH SCIENCE” with the same cadence as “PIGS IN SPACE!”), but the show turns out to be really well-done and interesting. Each episode is a…

The Structure of Science Itself

SEEDmagazine.com interviews Carl Bergstrom, whose eigenfactor project uses citation databases to map networks of information sharing within science: We find papers to read by following citation trails. If you have an eigenfactor of 1.5, it means 1.5% of the time, a researcher following citation trails is actually trying to get an article from your journal.…

Continuing the current discussion of the questionable quality of popular science journalism, British researcher Simon Baron-Cohen weighs in at the New Scientist with his personal experiences of misrepresented research. Baron-Cohen complains that earlier this year, several articles on his work linking prenatal testosterone levels to autistic traits, including coverage in the Guardian, were titled and…

From Failblog. (I dedicate this to Hungry Hyaena, who holds extremely nuanced views on the ethics of hunting, and would no doubt have an easier time if he embraced complete denial, like this poor person).

Norwich State Hospital, Piano “New England Ruins” Rob Dobi, 2005 Three quietly stunning collections of photos mix the ache of loss with the unintentional but undeniable beauty of decay. First, Rob Dobi’s “New England Ruins” documents abandoned buildings in various states of abandonment. His compositions vary from grand (abandoned stages and performance halls) to mundane…

Photo by Tracy Woodward, WaPo Yesterday, zookeepers at the National Zoo’s Conservation and Research Center discovered two newborn clouded leopard cubs in the enclosure of their mother, Jao Chu. This is a big deal because it is notoriously difficult to breed clouded leopards in captivity: males can attack and kill females with whom they aren’t…

Beauty and the Bones

Richard Avedon, The New Yorker, 1995 Via Haute Macabre, an unbelievable fashion editorial created by Richard Avedon for the New Yorker. I have no words. Richard Avedon, The New Yorker, 1995 See the complete editorial at Haute Macabre.

It’s Ada Lovelace Day! Ada Lovelace (1815 – 1852) is often referred to as the world’s first computer programmer. The daughter of the famous poet Lord Byron, and the admired intellect, Annabella Milbanke, Ada Lovelace represented the meeting of two alternative worlds: the romanticism and art of her father versus the rationality and science of…

The Sleeping Venus (1944) Paul Delvaux Observatory is a new collaborative art space located in Brooklyn, where it is reportedly sandwiched between Proteus Gowanus, Cabinet Magazine, and the Morbid Anatomy library. Its illustrious proprietors include Pam of Phantasmaphile, Joanna of Morbid Anatomy, and D&M of Curious Expeditions. And if that’s not reason enough to be…