bioephemera

Archives for March, 2009

Mrs. Bennett circa 1818-1821 Wellcome Library While browsing Morbid Anatomy recently I did a double take: is that the hypochondriac matriarch of Pride and Prejudice, only zombified? No, Lizzy’s mother has not succumbed to the unmentionable scourge – yet. This Mrs. Bennett is a coincidentally named Georgian lady who suffered from an unnamed skin ailment,…

How They Make Anatomical Models

Via Morbid Anatomy: the Discovery Channel series “How It’s Made” features the construction of modern anatomical models. You can watch the five-minute segment after the fold.

Linotype operators work in the composing room at the P-I building at 6th and Wall Street in December, 1948. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer photo) To follow up on my post about science journalism and blogs, a few reading links dealing with science in society, journalism, and the transformation of media.

This revealing anatomical card by Oregon designer Nathan Chrislip can be had for only $9 plus shipping on etsy. (Chrislip calls it a “valentine,” but unless your beloved is also an avowed anatomophile, be sure to enclose a message making your nonviolent romantic intent clear.) Via Rag and Bone Blog

This is pretty darn good for Stanford students! 😉 Ready for the final?

Illustration by David Parkins, Nature Today, Nature released a news feature by Geoff Brumfiel on the downturn in mainstream science media. We’ve all known that this is happening; the alarms become impossible to ignore when Peter Dysktra and his team at CNN lost their jobs last year. For mainstream outlets like CNN or the Boston…

After reading my pitiable lament about the demise of several domestic artisan chocolate factories, my friend wunx sent me two bars of Amano chocolate! Yum! I don’t know why it seems so odd to me that good dark chocolate is being made just outside Salt Lake City, but Amano’s product is delicious. I highly recommend…

Via Bora’s blog, a delightfully cheesy1955 filmstrip about why science education is more important than anything else – even fishing. It starts out slow, but this Sputnik-era treasure turns into a veritable propagandafest about how science literacy is a civic duty. Plus, it raises vital questions like “Why do these kids have weird pseudo-Southern accents…

I know I’ve typed out some howlers in my day, so I say this with all due humility. But this post over at iO9 had me rolling on the floor last night: Paul Murtaugh, a statistician at Corvallis’ Oregon State University, claims that our carbon legacy isn’t just limited to our own emissions, but 50%…

About two weeks ago I went to Politics and Prose for a great talk by the New Yorker‘s Adam Gopnik, who was in DC promoting his new book, Angels and Ages, a book of essays about Charles Darwin and Abraham Lincoln. The words and actions of these two influential men – some would call them…