bioephemera

Archives for July, 2009

. . . as soon as possible. As you may have noticed, Scienceblogs is having a few hiccups as it transitions to new servers. I’m having a few issues myself as I transition to a new apartment this week, so the blog will be fairly dead until everything gets straightened out. In the meantime, here’s…

“O.K., let’s slowly lower in the grant money.” Todd Bearson Arlington, Mass. This cartoon in the latest New Yorker gave me a (cynical) guffaw this morning. Nice caption, Todd Bearson. . . do you work in science?

Do You Like My Hat? Lori Field Lori Field uses mixed media, including encaustic, to create collage dreamscapes inspired by medical and botanical illustrations. Apparently two-headed kittens are also a theme. See more at the artist’s gallery website. Check out The Little Death and Frog Princess. found via dr.hypercube

Don’t mess with the brain

Reader Mike sent me the link to this Coke commercial a while ago. I love the exasperated brain pulling himself around – he’s like a mob boss driven crazy by his stupid henchmen. Their other ads aren’t quite as funny, because they make you overthink the situation (if the eyeball can’t drink Coke because it…

$10 well spent

Ethan at Starts With a Bang has promised to shave his head if 100 commenters promise to give at least $10 to charity or volunteer for 4 hours. So naturally, I had to chip in. Wanna help?

While browsing etsy this weekend, I was impressed with some of the unusual pieces from seller 19moons. These salvaged, chimeric pieces look much more expensive than they are.

Goo-mageddon?

Or is it Arma-goo-ddon? For some reason, balls of unidentified biological goo have started showing up in the news. First we had the mysterious North Carolina sewer blob. It turned out that was just a colony of tubifex worms – yes, the same kind you feed your fish. But now we have a giant oceanic…

An electrifying garden

Alstroemeria, sp. Robert Buelteman One of my favorite short stories is Hawthorne’s Rappaccini’s Daughter, in which an eccentric, Frankensteinian botanist breeds increasingly beautiful, increasingly deadly flowers. These images from Robert Buelteman remind me of Rappaccini’s garden. His creative process sure sounds like something Dr. Frankenstein might have employed: Buelteman hits everything with an electric pulse…

Janet has a very interesting post over at Adventures in Ethics, springboarding off Chris Mooney & Sheril Kirshenbaum’s new book Unscientific America. She discusses a key concept that seems obvious, but constantly ends up being ignored by both pro-science and anti-science factions: scientists are not a monolithic interest group. (For one thing, we disagree about…

Check out these remarkable photos of patterns grown in Japanese rice fields using different strains of pigmented rice. A number of commenters on the thread at funster have suggested the photos are faked, so I found this Japanese news clip on YouTube. I like the art in the video clip even better!