bioephemera

Archives for November, 2009

Willy Chyr’s Balluminescence

Talk about ephemera – Willy Chyr makes bioart out of balloons! Check out his installation Balluminescence: Balluminescence – Lights, Balloons, Jellyfish! was commissioned by Science Chicago and was created for the program’s finale signature event – LabFest! Millennium Park. An interactive installation, Balluminescence engaged participants in the process of creating art inspired by science. A…

Butterflies in Space

Macro Detail from a print from Press NY. via Blue Barnhouse Unfortunately the Press NY website appears to be defunct, but this image should be in the new letterpress book being compiled over at Blue Barnhouse. Check out their blog for more info on the book!

The Laboratory at Harvard

I’m currently attending the Grand Opening of the new Laboratory at Harvard University, “an exhibition and meeting space for student idea development within and between the arts and sciences,” for a special colloquium on Art, Science, and Creativity featuring David Edwards (author of ArtScience), Lisa Randall, and others. This is awesome. Stay tuned for a…

Louis Menand has a must-read article on what’s wrong with graduate education in the Harvard Magazine: Lives are warped because of the length and uncertainty of the doctoral education process. Many people drop in and drop out and then drop in again; a large proportion of students never finish; and some people have to retool…

Google’s Phantom Town

Townephemera? The hamlet of Argleton, UK apparently exists only on Google Maps. The Telegraph reports that Roy Bayfield actually went there to check: “A colleague of mine spotted the anomaly on Google Maps, and I thought ‘I’ve got to go there’,” he said. “I started to weave this amazing fantasy about the place, an alternative…

In case you didn’t see it, the latest xkcd is a visual shout-out to data visualization guru Edward Tufte’s favorite map, this 1861 depiction of Napoleon’s march on Moscow, by Charles Joseph Minard. Yay! Movie Narrative Charts Charles Minard’s 1869 chart showing the losses in men, their movements, and the temperature of Napoleon’s 1812 Russian…

Magnetic Movie from Semiconductor on Vimeo. Last week, at the imagine science film festival in New York, Magnetic Movie won the Nature Scientific Merit Award: In 2009, the Nature Scientific Merit Award went to the film judged to be not only the most deserving but also the most scientifically accurate, Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhard’s…

Since I posted last night, DrugMonkey, Dr. Free-Ride, and the Intersection have also checked in with their POVs on this issue. I particularly liked this comment from Dr. Free-Ride: We get to foot the bill for the effects of other people’s “moral failings” here as it is. Why, then, should it be so objectionable to…

My mom, like millions of others in the U.S., has been a smoker for decades. She’s tried to quit a few times, but it’s been hard for her. The thing that’s helped the most so far? The nicotine patch. While the patch is not a universal cure – see the Mayo Clinic’s analysis here –…

Escherichia Ophelia

The very epitome of bioephemera, from Microbial Art: Artist JoWOnder presents a pre-Raphaelite painting of Ophelia created with bacteria. The demise of the painting is filmed using time-lapse photography, showing a story of death and creation of new life. The colors and animation for ‘6 Days Goodbye Poems Of Ophelia’ were created in a laboratory…