bioephemera

Archives for February, 2010

Last week, I braved a nasty sleety Cambridge evening to see Rebecca Skloot read from her excellent new book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. I’m thrilled to tell you it’s finally being released on Amazon tomorrow, so if you haven’t already been to your local bookstore, go snag a copy (or enter to win…

I have my priorities! Do I even need to comment on how awesome this is? Via iO9.

Hola BioE readers, I’ve been blogging at Scienceblogs for two years this month, and prior to that, I blogged for another year at my own site. So it is not surprising that I am very, very tired. Blogging uses up a big chunk of my dwindling free time, which I also need for such things…

cardboard safari: lasercut ephemera

Astro Rocket I got my boyfriend one of these adorable Astro Rockets from cardboard safari for Valentine’s Day. The large ones are frighteningly expensive, but the smallest one is cute, remarkably well designed, and despite being cardboard, has that pleasant burnt-wood odor of a carpentry shop. Mmmm, laser-cuts. They also have these kind of hilarious…

Love, in its anatomical connections

From the Cold Spring Harbor Archive (click for larger image). From Micklos, The Science of Eugenics, pg 116 (1930).

Upcoming at Observatory in NYC: Entomologia (Feb 26-April 4), a group show of art incorporating and inspired by insects. I’m particularly intrigued by the discussion scheduled for April 3, “Transgenics, Cybernetics, and Evolution:” Silkworms engineered to produce pharmaceuticals and hormones, cyborg dragonflies designed for high-speed missions and surveillance… In connection with her recent work, Shanna…

Just in time for Valentine’s Day: the “Copulating Earthworm Necklace,” from heronadornment on etsy. Also love her anatomical heart locket.

Chris Jordan: Impossible Numbers

Year of the Tiger, 2010 Chris Jordan Depicts 3200 toy tigers, equal to the estimated number of tigers remaining on Earth. The space in the middle would hold 40,000 of these tigers, equal to the global tiger population in 1970. SEED has put together a slideshow of works by Chris Jordan, an artist I mentioned…

On Tuesday, Feb. 23, National Geographic Explorer will be devoting an episode to “Vampire Forensics.” You can preview a brief clip below the fold, but I’ll warn you now: it’s not CSI. It’s more scientific (“unfortunately this evidence is inconclusive” LOL) and less sexy (inexplicably, Emily Proctor is nowhere to be seen). Overall, the feeling…

What is wrong with this fruit?

It literally took me a good 20 seconds to figure out what was. . . off. . . about the first photo in this great post by Emily at SheChive. Sigh. 😉 Thanks to Jake for the heads-up!