bioephemera

Archives for May, 2010

DC area artist Michele Banks works with wet-in-wet watercolor to create abstract paintings of biological subjects – lots of cells, mitotic spindles, etc. You can see more of her work at her Makers Market shop (under the nom d’art Artologica), or at the SoWeBohemian Festival in Baltimore this weekend.

This is what I miss out on by not reading the physical copy of the New York Times: ads! I recently picked up a copy of the Times science section and saw an ad for these wonderful vintage patent office models from the 1900s. As if they’re not steampunky enough, each one comes with a…

Dead birds in the garden

Susan Silas takes photos of fallen birds – and they’re oddly touching. It’s very strange how songbirds remain graceful, even when broken and half-decayed. . .

My friend Shana mentioned this one to me: it’s an LED sculpture that opens at night and folds closed during the day, like a light-sensitive flower. The creator, Wendy Legro, says: “The sun is our natural light source. Our homes are filled with artificial light replacing it, undeliberately disrupting our biological clock. This product works…

On Tuesday my friend John O, neuroscientist and social media outreach officer, gave a five-minute talk called “You’ve Been Scienced: Communicating Military Science and Technology with Social Media” at Gov 2.0 Expo 2010. Take my word for it: some things that seem obvious to researchers (like collaboration) aren’t exactly routine in government bureaucracy. But the…

Edge.org has invited comments on Craig Venter’s synthetic bacterium from thinkers like Freeman Dyson, George Dyson, and our very own PZ Myers. Nassim Taleb is particularly pessimistic: If I understand this well, to the creationists, this should be an insult to God; but, further, to the evolutionist, this is certainly an insult to evolution. And…

An email from reader Jake prompted me to repost this look at Peter Callesen, originally posted back in 2007. Enjoy! Angel, 2005 paper and glue in artist made frame Peter Callesen This beautifully written essay at Cabinet of Wonders, Mechanical Thinking and the Human Soul, includes some amazing sculptures by paper artist Peter Callesen. Callesen’s…

Here’s another interesting summer reading prospect for BioE-philes: Still Life: Adventures in Taxidermy by Melissa Milgrom. From the New York Times review: The best chapter in “Still Life” by far is the one in which Ms. Milgrom visits with the fascinating and foul-mouthed British artist Emily Mayer, the woman who is Mr. Hirst’s taxidermist. She’s…

Apparently the Republicans learned nothing from Change.gov and the White House’s problematic experiments with crowdsourcing, because they’ve now invited web-based public input to shape their 2010 party platform. According to Dana Milbank, so far, the suggestions include such gems as “A ‘teacher’ told my child in class that dolphins were mammals and not fish! And…

Never Pure: Historical Studies of Science as if It Was Produced by People with Bodies, Situated in Time, Space, Culture, and Society, and Struggling for Credibility and Authority: this could be awesome, or very very bad. I can’t wait to find out.