bioephemera

Archives for October, 2010

Wildlife of Vietnam, by Brendan Wenzel This bundle of exotic animals by Brendan Wenzel is whimsical, yet unsettling. On the one hand, it would be perfect for a children’s book; I imagine a tale in which the animals overcome their natural animosities, cooperate to free themselves, dump a hapless and ineptly nonthreatening poacher in the…

Just plain awesome: Thanks to Jennifer Ouellette for the heads-up.

Have e-books killed tree-books?

Have e-books killed tree-books? I hope not – I love hefting a brand-new book in my hand and letting the pages fan open. It’s sensual and anticipation-laden, like opening a bottle of good wine. But perhaps science writer and blogger Carl Zimmer is hedging his bets on the future of paper books: he’s released his…

An Eyeful of Sound

Just in: the 2010 Imagine Science Films Festival‘s Nature Scientific Merit award, given to “a short film that exemplifies science in narrative filmmaking in a compelling, credible and inspiring manner,” is An Eyeful of Sound, a short film about audio-visual synaesthesia by Samantha Moore. Here’s the trailer:  An Eyeful of Sound – trailer from…

detail of “Williamsburg Bridge Plaza,” Brooklyn, NY, circa 1906 Source: Shorpy I’m just saying, I don’t think that’s a speck on the negative. But maybe I’m too cynical.

A couple of days ago, the New York Times reported on an undergraduate class at Harvard that teaches the science of cooking. It’s called “Science & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science,” and it’s popular: if you’re a Harvard undergrad, you have about a 43% chance of winning a seat at the lab…

And now for a completely different type of glass art: this time from sculptor Luke Jerram. His deceptively beautiful glass malaria parasite (see video below) will be auctioned off to benefit Malaria No More. Via Medical Museion. The “malaria parasite” is also known as Plasmodium falciparum. Read more about Jerram’s sculpture here – no, I…

Reader Miles suggested Danny Cooke’s graceful documentary about ornamental glass & sign artist David A. Smith, who uses traditional techniques like gilding, silvering, and etching to create ornate glass signs and windows with aesthetics from Victorian to Art Nouveau. Time-lapse sequences offer a surreal glimpse of Smith dexterously floating giant panels of glass around his…

R.I.P., Benoit Mandelbrot

“Mandelbrot Set,” by Jonathan Coulton, via Wired.

What do you get when you ask Harvard physicist Lisa Randall to curate an art show? A Los Angeles gallery found out, and Wired has the story. My favorite quote: I asked Mays whether the artists gained an appreciation for physics. “Oh god, yes!” he said. “I’ve seen them carrying books around about different scientific…