bioephemera

Archives for November, 2010

This year’s winner of the BioScapes digital imaging competition, Igor Siwanowicz, triumphed with a somewhat unusual portrait. To most biologists, it should be clear what anatomical structures are shown here – but what species could this be? Igor Siwanowicz, Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology, Munich, Germany. First Prize, 2010 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition┬«. click…

Hannah Waters at Culturing Science has written a lovely little post on the day-to-day benefits of having a scientific worldview: I grew up immersed in science. Any facts that exist that I couldn’t reconcile with experience, I just chalked up to the limitations of my senses or even my brain’s ability to conceptualize (the latter…

The New York Times decided earlier this week that biological animation warrants its own article. About time! ­čÖé Seriously, for those of you who haven’t discovered BioVisions‘ amazing animations, you should check them out and/or use them in class – with the caveat that they’re not “pure” data: While acknowledging the potential to help refine…

Edward Tufte auctions off his library

In less than a month (December 2nd), Christie’s will auction off Edward Tufte’s library – an idiosyncratic collection of first edition books, plates, prints, and ephemera that the dataviz guru calls his “Museum of Cognitive Art,” and I call “Jessica’s Christmas List.” I’m not going to sample low-rez images of the lots here, because there’s…

IBM has a new commercial depicting the constant streams of medical biodata that can be gathered from a human body, and hopefully improve healthcare. In a shameless play to elicit warm fuzzies, they made it about very young babies: Awwwww. With all the glowing data, it’s sort of like a baby TRON. And what’s with…

With a poster titled “WE NEED YOUR BODY! For a UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY,” microbiologist Steven Park and artist Anne Brodie invited attendees at the British Science Festival to stand NAKED inside our live bioluminescent photograph booth and have your photograph taken. Enveloped by a living ethereal blue green light, the resulting faint and ghostly image will…

For health organizations, federal agencies and nonprofits alike, it’s a challenge to get anyone to pay attention long enough to hear your prevention messages, much less to actually change their behavior as a result. It’s even harder with kids. It’s not that they don’t care about science; quite the contrary, they love it – especially…

Knight Fellow Geoff McGhee created this polished video documentary series about how data visualization is infiltrating and transforming journalism. Interviews with Many Eyes creators Fernanda Viegas and Martin Wattenberg, Amanda Cox of the New York Times, and other dataviz luminaries are coupled with bios and links to further information, some history of visualization techniques, industry…

Hippocampus: Broad Overview Tamily Weissman, Jeff Lichtman, and Joshua Sanes, 2005 from Portraits of the Mind: Visualizing the Brain from Antiquity to the 21st Century by Carl Schoonover The first time I created a transgenic neuron, it was in a worm, C. elegans — a tiny, transparent cousin of the earthworm. I injected DNA into…

Endangered species?

Poor, outnumbered moderates. . . I decided to wait until the election mayhem abated before reviewing Carl Schoonover’s EXTREMELY outstanding new book Portraits of the Mind: Visualizing the Brain from Antiquity to the 21st Century. If you’re tired of looking at red and blue Rorschach tests, drop by tomorrow for my review.