bioephemera

Archives for December, 2010

It’s a Happy New Year. . .

. . . especially with these delicate, icy Orion constellation cards from Campbell Raw Press.

Vintage science for the walls

This series of sciart wallpapers by Dan Funderburgh were inspired by the Time-Life Science Library, a series of educational books published in the 1960s. For those of us old enough to remember them, Time-Life’s series are objects of nostalgia in themselves. Coupling the vintage design and palettes of those books with vintage sci-art symbolism yields…

Fabrication de bonbons à Berlin from philmotion productions on Vimeo. Via NOTCOT.

No. “If we could gather all the electric eels from all around the world,” they would free their imprisoned brother from his Yuletide servitude and bio-tase the crap out of you, bro. Just sayin’.

I have no idea how I missed this before the holidays (sorry!), but NBDesigns has a line of oxidized silver embryo jewelry that is pure vintage lab-chic. The embryonic mice are particularly adorable: And, on the less-cute, more-sciency end of the spectrum, her embryonic chicks look just like illustrations in an old dev bio textbook:…

Cathedrals of sound

Tatiana Plakhova’s “Music is Maths”: what cathedrals should look like on the TRON Grid. Via fubiz.

Via iO9, a Nature News slideshow of natural history engravings by physician Martin Lister’s teenage daughters, who contributed technically accurate engravings of shells to one of his books, the Historiae Conchyliorum: Historians now believe the pair were the first women to use microscopes to help produce some of their scientific drawings. Anna and Susanna’s place…

Because people have been discussing Google ngrams a lot, and because there are always major caveats to new datamining methodologies, I have to link Natalie Binder’s excellent series of posts urging caution, not only about the methodology, but about assuming too much about ngrams’ utility in social research.

The ultimate bioephemera: art you eat! This cephalopod by specialty cake artist Karen Portoleo is definitely NOT a cake wreck (although if there were a little cake(ship)wreck under those tentacles, it might not be a bad addition). Karen previously made a “gingerbread” house with an octopus icing and tiling the roof. For serious. Thanks to…

Olivier Valsecchi’s portraits of the nude human body, caught in motion, haloed in dust, could convey an incredibly complicated subtext. Or not. “Dust” by Olivier Valsecchi, via ChangetheThought via Street Anatomy.