bioephemera

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David Clarke, president of the DC chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators (a great group that I considered joining once, long ago and several careers away), just passed along an invitation to an event next week. The artists who created the work in the Smithsonian’s NMNH Hall of Human Origins will be talking about their process, the science behind it, the equipment they use and the working of their studios. While this is the DC GNSI meeting, they are graciously opening it to the public, so if you are in the DC area, consider attending.

More info about the event below the fold. If you’re not in DC, you may still wish to check out the websites of artists Karen Carr (who painted the prehistoric cave painter above – how meta!) and John Gurche.

Presentation: The Art of the Hall of Human Origins: An Evening with John Gurche and Karen Carr
Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 6:00 – 8:00 PM
In the Cathy Kerby Room of the NMNH (3rd Floor, East Court)

Tonight, paleo-artists John Gurche and Karen Carr will discuss the science and techniques behind their work for the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History’s Hall of Human Origins.

John Gurche has over 30 years experience as a paleo-artist including work for the Smithsonian, Field and American Museums of Natural History, National Geographic and the US Postal Service. He received the Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize from the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology in 2000 for his mural of Sue the Tyrannosaurus in the Field Museum. Using his training as an artist, anthropologist and paleontologist along with the latest forensic techniques, John sculpted the lifelike reconstructions of early human busts along with five bronze statues of different early species on display in the Hall.

Wildlife and natural history artist Karen Carr has
displayed her artwork, in both traditional and electronic media, in publications, zoos, museums and parks across the United States, Japan and Europe. Her most recent works include major illustration projects and publications for the Smithsonian Institution, the Audubon Society, Random House, HarperCollins and others, and she has authored or illustrated more than a half-dozen recent books for young readers. Her studio provided more than 700 images for the Hall, including murals, illustrations, graphics and maps, A/V components and other images.

For those who need an escort, congregate in the Constitution Ave. Lobby of the National Museum of Natural History between 5:30 and 6:00 PM.

If you need to park in the Natural History Parking Lot, bring a printed copy of this message to show the parking guard. Enter on the West side from Constitution Avenue.