bioephemera

Archives for August, 2011

Greg Dunn’s golden neurons

Gold Cortex 16 x 20, 2010 Greg Dunn I used to have a beautiful gold Japanese folding screen, which was purchased by my great-grandmother’s feisty sister on a trip in the 1920s. I loved the gold patina and the surprisingly modern impact it had on my wall. At the moment, it’s loaned to a friend,…

Window Shopping

Two very BioE-esque images spotted in Portland, Oregon:

Poem of the Week: Debora Greger

Under glass, a bare forest of pins held down an army of insects in ragged rows. . . –”The Expression of Emotion in Man and Insects,” by Debora Greger (read the full poem at the Atlantic)

Chalk Outline Tree Armando Fontes (graffiti) and Catia Rissi (photographer) Armondo Fontes and Catia Rissi call their chalk outlines of cut urban trees a “collective denunciation as an environmental graffiti.” Fontes, who lives in the city of Belo Horizonte in southeastern Brazil, saw that trees were being cut and the city was not replacing them.…

In a guest post at Scientific American, Rebecca Jablonsky says, Kuhn de-legitimized the understanding of science as implicitly including objective reality, leaving room for theory to de-stabilize rituals of practice and produce authentic innovation-something that is certainly prized in both artistic and scientific communities alike. Seriously – go read it and come back. It’s short.…

Miniature Fantasies: Paolo Ventura

L’Automaton #06, 2010 Paolo Ventura (zoom view available here) Artist-photographer Paolo Ventura constructs and photographs miniature, dreamlike scenes. His Winter Stories represent the reminisces of an old circus performer. Above, a scene from the Automaton series captures a mysterious, half-built android. Who is the android’s creator? When and where is this happening? Ventura’s work is…

Perry’s Arcana

From 1810-11, architect and amateur naturalist George Perry published The Arcana, a lavishly illustrated, serial natural history magazine. Although Perry intended for the serial issues to be assembled by his subscribers into a book, only thirteen complete copies are known to survive today. More than a third of the known copies are in Australia –…

“Magnetic Field Outflows from Active Galactic Nuclei” P.M. Sutter, P.M. Ricker, H.-Y. Yang, G. Foreman, D. Pugmire/ORNL Wired has an article/webgallery of award-winning scientific visualizations which is worth a lunchtime visit. (Having trouble with Wired‘s interface? The videos collected there are the winners from SciDAC 2011′s “Visualization Night” challenge, so you can also just watch…

Annalisa Crannell, a professor at Franklin & Marshall, has a great essay at Inside Higher Ed on the math of perspective. Crannell, who thinks her students are generally more scared of drawing than they are of math, uses the “fencepost puzzle” to get her students working through the proportions that create realism: We mathematicians tend…

This little video from Abebooks is the closest I’ve ever gotten to flipping through a copy of the Codex Seraphinianus. What a truly weird book. I particularly love it when the staid narrator reveals his “favorite” illustration – a roller skater murdered by a monstrous pen. What?! The Codex reminds me of If You’re Afraid…