Artists & Art

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Category archives for Artists & Art

Kate MacDowell: bloodless bodies

Entangled, 2010 handbuilt porcelain, cone 6 glaze Kate MacDowell sculpts partially dissected frogs, decaying bodies with exposed skeletons, and viscera invaded by tentacles or ants. It’s the imagery of nightmares, death metal music videos, or that tunnel scene in the original Willy Wonka (not a speck of light is showing, so the danger must be…

Greg Dunn’s golden neurons

Gold Cortex 16 x 20, 2010 Greg Dunn I used to have a beautiful gold Japanese folding screen, which was purchased by my great-grandmother’s feisty sister on a trip in the 1920s. I loved the gold patina and the surprisingly modern impact it had on my wall. At the moment, it’s loaned to a friend,…

Chalk Outline Tree Armando Fontes (graffiti) and Catia Rissi (photographer) Armondo Fontes and Catia Rissi call their chalk outlines of cut urban trees a “collective denunciation as an environmental graffiti.” Fontes, who lives in the city of Belo Horizonte in southeastern Brazil, saw that trees were being cut and the city was not replacing them.…

In a guest post at Scientific American, Rebecca Jablonsky says, Kuhn de-legitimized the understanding of science as implicitly including objective reality, leaving room for theory to de-stabilize rituals of practice and produce authentic innovation-something that is certainly prized in both artistic and scientific communities alike. Seriously – go read it and come back. It’s short.…

Miniature Fantasies: Paolo Ventura

L’Automaton #06, 2010 Paolo Ventura (zoom view available here) Artist-photographer Paolo Ventura constructs and photographs miniature, dreamlike scenes. His Winter Stories represent the reminisces of an old circus performer. Above, a scene from the Automaton series captures a mysterious, half-built android. Who is the android’s creator? When and where is this happening? Ventura’s work is…

Annalisa Crannell, a professor at Franklin & Marshall, has a great essay at Inside Higher Ed on the math of perspective. Crannell, who thinks her students are generally more scared of drawing than they are of math, uses the “fencepost puzzle” to get her students working through the proportions that create realism: We mathematicians tend…

New artscience blog: Symbiartic

FYI: longtime blogger-artist Glendon Mellow has teamed up with Kalliopi Monoyios to start a new artscience/sciart blog, Symbiartic, for Scientific American’s blog hub. For a taste, check out this post on why cameras won’t replace artists anytime soon.

Untitled, from “The Others” Jordan Tiberio My favorite thing about the internet is serendipity. Click here, click there, and the next thing you know you’re scrolling down the gallery of an 18-year-old photographer whose artistic sensibility seems equal parts 1970s fashion magazine, pre-Raphaelite fairy tale, and Sigur Ros music video. Lovely young women are hardly…

Nick’s Luncheonette Randy Hage Via the eye-candy blog How to Be a Retronaut (thanks Miles for first sending me a link there), the painstakingly accurate miniature Manhattan streetscapes of LA artist Randy Hage are half-toy, half-historical document – a wonder cabinet of urban curiosities. Hage’s overarching goal is to preserve rapidly disappearing streetscapes. As he…

From the Smithsonian, a short video about using technology to virtually reassemble ancient art from fragments long carried away and dispersed: Majestic sixth-century Chinese Buddhist sculpture is combined with 3-D imaging technology in this exploration of one of the most important groups of Buddhist devotional sites in early medieval China. Carved into the mountains of…