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Recently, Scienceblogs/National Geographic decided it would no longer host pseudonymous science bloggers. As a result, many of my former colleagues have left. I think this decision was wrong. Read on for my reasons.

In a guest post at Scientific American, Rebecca Jablonsky says, Kuhn de-legitimized the understanding of science as implicitly including objective reality, leaving room for theory to de-stabilize rituals of practice and produce authentic innovation-something that is certainly prized in both artistic and scientific communities alike. Seriously – go read it and come back. It’s short.…

New artscience blog: Symbiartic

FYI: longtime blogger-artist Glendon Mellow has teamed up with Kalliopi Monoyios to start a new artscience/sciart blog, Symbiartic, for Scientific American’s blog hub. For a taste, check out this post on why cameras won’t replace artists anytime soon.

Nick’s Luncheonette Randy Hage Via the eye-candy blog How to Be a Retronaut (thanks Miles for first sending me a link there), the painstakingly accurate miniature Manhattan streetscapes of LA artist Randy Hage are half-toy, half-historical document – a wonder cabinet of urban curiosities. Hage’s overarching goal is to preserve rapidly disappearing streetscapes. As he…

This 1967 IBM propaganda film, “Paperwork Explosion,” couples an eerily deadpan refrain of “more time on paperwork,” with a creepy pseudo-country neighbor* urging us to embrace Progress. The film’s frenetic soundtrack and abrupt transitions embody the familiar hysterical nervousness of an increasingly automated era, while striving the whole time to convince us that technology will…

Why I no longer trust Yelp

One of the much-hyped benefits of social networking is that it provides a way to get personalized recommendations about businesses from a wider network. If I want to tell the world that the coffee place in my neighborhood has the best cappuccino this side of Seattle, I can do that (and it does)! That’s what…

A confluence of influences

minouette of magpie & whiskeyjack has posted an interesting meditation on the resemblances between Katie Scott‘s whimsical faux-botanical/biological atlas pages (above), the illustrations of Ernst Haeckel (whose portrait minouette just finished), and the Codex Seraphinianous. It’s a harmonious grouping of artistic influences – check it out.

Former Scibling Sheril Kirshenbaum, late of the Intersection, has moved to a new blog: Convergence. Let’s be honest: most of us are about intersections, convergences, confluences and whatnot; I’ve often described BioE as “the intersection of art & science.” But Sheril’s kicking the metaphor up a notch: Convergence is a forum to explore all sorts…

I was playing The Fracking Song last night about midnight, and my boyfriend was grooving to it. At the end he asked, “what was that about?” “Uh. . . fracking.” “Which kind of fracking?” Yes, we are a BSG household. Anyway, it may be an explainer, but it’s actually quite a nice little piece of…

Surrender, don’t cull

From Linda Holmes, a poignant post about how the deluge of information makes it impossible to scratch the surface in a single lifetime: there are really only two responses if you want to feel like you’re well-read, or well-versed in music, or whatever the case may be: culling and surrender. Culling is the choosing you…