Blogosphere

bioephemera

Category archives for Blogosphere

Artists who invent (and patent)

I’ve been remiss in not recommending my temporary Scienceblogs scibling “Art and Science Learning” to those of you who are, like me, interested in the sciart intersection. However, I have to say I am not 100% behind its latest (and quite popular post), by Robert Root-Bernstein. It starts, Most people are at a loss to…

A BioE million-stone!

Yesterday, bioephemera got its one millionth visit.* Thanks so much to everyone who reads, shares, and enjoys my posts – you’re why I keep blogging, in whatever spare time I can find. There’s just too much interesting stuff out there to keep it to myself when I find it, and I’ve met far too many…

Remember when I said more bio grad students should play with coding and modeling? Here’s an example of what I mean. Laurence Frabotta directed me to this animation by phylogeneticist/bioinformatics programmer Liam Revell, an assistant professor at U Mass Boston, who used the statistical package ‘R’ to write a short code generating all possible bifurcating…

Wow – my post about unhappy bio grad students is getting massive traffic. (Hi SlashDotters and StumbleUpon-ers!) Mike the Mad Biologist, my original inspiration, has responded here and here to all the buzz. I pretty much said everything I wanted to say in the original post, and I don’t pretend to have an explanation or…

Tomorrow morning, a three-judge panel of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit will hear arguments in the appeal of Association for Molecular Pathology v. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office – better known as the Myriad gene patent case.* It has the patent and genetic blogospheres in a bit of a tizzy, and the…

In addition to all the obvious reasons, tech blogger Jillian York recently noted that some web filters use comments, and links in comments, to categorize sites as pornography. This means even a blogger who diligently refrains from any, er, PhysioProfisms, can be classed as offensive and filtered based on comments alone. York explains how recently…

Christopher Reiger has a great post at Hungry Hyaena about public communication strategies used by scientific advocacy groups, and where artists should adopt similar strategies: Most Americans see science as extraneous esoterica crafted by white-coated wonks. Similarly, contemporary art is seen as the province of effete Onanists devoid of “family values.” But the respective responses…

Reader Laura alerted me to a self-described “weird art & style blog” that many of you may enjoy – it’s called Synesthesia Garden. A recent topic was custom lab-grown bone wedding rings (above): Harriet Harriss, one of the participants, says: “I love the idea that it’s precious only to us because it is, literally, us.…

I guess it’s not surprising, my dopamine is rising And my glutamate receptors are all shot I’d surely be bemoaning all the extra serotonin But my judgement is impaired and my confidence is not Allosteric modulation No Long Term Potentiation Hastens my inebriation Give me a beer. . . Physiology professors, I trust you know…

For everyone frustrated with the unscientific, spotty, incoherent and often inaccurate coverage of the Japanese nuclear plant situation: one geo-blogger and her dad try to help out. Now THAT is how you use your scientific expertise to improve public understanding in a meaningful, immediate way. Bravo, georneys!