Books & Essays

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Category archives for Books & Essays

And I do mean Dreadful. In honor of Zombiefest, which is a totally random blogholiday I made up, and all my awesome readers, the first person to email me their US mailing address gets a copy of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dreadfully Ever After. Wow – that took longer than I expected. 🙂

Alternative Careers in Science

I have a copy of “Alternative Careers in Science: Leaving the Ivory Tower” (1998 edition) that I’ll mail to the first person who emails me their (US) address. Sorry, It’s taken!

Call for irreverent mashups!

O designer-readers who like to work and play with Photoshop, this contest may be up your alley: Quirk Books, the outfit behind Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, has joined with Bridgeman Art Library to invite submissions for its “Art of the Mash-Up” competition. Basically, they want you to prove you can do better than the…

Brian Dettmer, the Book Surgeon

Lest any of my faithful readers think they’re the only ones whose wonderful linky suggestions I don’t seem to get around to posting, my boyfriend sent me this and I didn’t post it, and apparently it’s on the Daily Dish and 3QD today & he’s all like “why didn’t you post it sooner? Didn’t you…

Psychologist Robert Kurzban’s new book promises to explain Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite. It’s a bold promise, and I was skeptical when first invited to review it. But Kurzban delivered – hilariously, entertainingly so. Although since I agree with almost everything he writes, I may not be the most objective of critics. (FYI: this…

I found this children’s encyclopedia in a pile of books on the curb a few weeks ago. Some of its depictions of science are charming; some are odd, and all are really, really dated. More snapshots below the fold. . .

The NYT has a great little article about Chevalier Jackson, a turn-of-the-century doctor who kept a collection of foreign objects removed from people’s throats. Dr. Jackson “preserved more than 2,000 objects that people had swallowed or inhaled: nails and bolts, miniature binoculars, a radiator key, a child’s perfect-attendance pin, a medallion that says “Carry me…

Weekend reading

Here are some essay links I’ve had open as tabs in my browser for over a week, waiting to be posted. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to do the extensive commentary they deserve, so I’m admitting that, and just posting them already. Enjoy. Graphical Abstracts & Biologists as Designers Andrew Sun discusses “graphical abstracts” at…

Vintage science for the walls

This series of sciart wallpapers by Dan Funderburgh were inspired by the Time-Life Science Library, a series of educational books published in the 1960s. For those of us old enough to remember them, Time-Life’s series are objects of nostalgia in themselves. Coupling the vintage design and palettes of those books with vintage sci-art symbolism yields…

Because people have been discussing Google ngrams a lot, and because there are always major caveats to new datamining methodologies, I have to link Natalie Binder’s excellent series of posts urging caution, not only about the methodology, but about assuming too much about ngrams’ utility in social research.