History of Science

bioephemera

Category archives for History of Science

So I’m all in favor of promoting struggling artists, and that includes documentary filmmakers. But I have to say I’m a little taken aback by the aesthetic of the “Synthetic Bio” documentary project by Field Test Films (and endorsed by Carl Zimmer). They’ve posted a short over at Kickstarter, where they’re trying to raise $30K…

Observatory is hosting another great event tonight: From Heumann Heilmittel, “Eine Reise durch den menschlichen K├Ârper” (1941) Body Voyaging: an illustrated lecture with Kristen Ann Ehrenberger Date: TONIGHT, Monday, January 17th Time: 8:00 PM Admission: $5 Presented by Morbid Anatomy We human beings have a seemingly insatiable desire to experience the bodies underneath our skins.…

The NYT has a great little article about Chevalier Jackson, a turn-of-the-century doctor who kept a collection of foreign objects removed from people’s throats. Dr. Jackson “preserved more than 2,000 objects that people had swallowed or inhaled: nails and bolts, miniature binoculars, a radiator key, a child’s perfect-attendance pin, a medallion that says “Carry me…

Weekend reading

Here are some essay links I’ve had open as tabs in my browser for over a week, waiting to be posted. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to do the extensive commentary they deserve, so I’m admitting that, and just posting them already. Enjoy. Graphical Abstracts & Biologists as Designers Andrew Sun discusses “graphical abstracts” at…

Vintage science for the walls

This series of sciart wallpapers by Dan Funderburgh were inspired by the Time-Life Science Library, a series of educational books published in the 1960s. For those of us old enough to remember them, Time-Life’s series are objects of nostalgia in themselves. Coupling the vintage design and palettes of those books with vintage sci-art symbolism yields…

Via iO9, a Nature News slideshow of natural history engravings by physician Martin Lister’s teenage daughters, who contributed technically accurate engravings of shells to one of his books, the Historiae Conchyliorum: Historians now believe the pair were the first women to use microscopes to help produce some of their scientific drawings. Anna and Susanna’s place…

This is un freaking real. My friend John O at Armed With Science has dug up a classic animated film produced for the National Naval Medical Center in 1973. It starts with an awards ceremony for the “Communicable Disease of the Year,” hosted by the Grim Reaper (who turns out to know a lot about…

Diptheria vaccinations in the 1920s The town of Leicester was a particular hotbed of anti vaccine activity and the site of many anti-vaccine rallies. The local paper described the details of a rally: “An escort was formed, preceded by a banner, to escort a young mother and two men, all of whom had resolved to…

After some scrambling, the Eavesmade team (self-described purveyors of “lasercut science goodness”) has their scientist ornaments back in stock! And I have my very own beribboned Carl Sagan and Albert Einstein! Here they are on my mantel; Sagan is on a rocket, and Einstein is pondering time, of course: Due to popular demand, Eavesmade just…