Littademia

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Category archives for Littademia

Surrender, don’t cull

From Linda Holmes, a poignant post about how the deluge of information makes it impossible to scratch the surface in a single lifetime: there are really only two responses if you want to feel like you’re well-read, or well-versed in music, or whatever the case may be: culling and surrender. Culling is the choosing you…

Wait – did Peter Nowogrodski just shoehorn everything I love into one meandering, indulgent multimedia essay??* Tolkien’s Shire appears as a coherent ecosystem, cradled by productive fields and populated by abundant orchards, caches of edible mushroom, and even the fishable Bywater Pool, ornamented with an authentic churning mill. The land at Hobbiton is changing still:…

Call for irreverent mashups!

O designer-readers who like to work and play with Photoshop, this contest may be up your alley: Quirk Books, the outfit behind Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, has joined with Bridgeman Art Library to invite submissions for its “Art of the Mash-Up” competition. Basically, they want you to prove you can do better than the…

Brian Dettmer, the Book Surgeon

Lest any of my faithful readers think they’re the only ones whose wonderful linky suggestions I don’t seem to get around to posting, my boyfriend sent me this and I didn’t post it, and apparently it’s on the Daily Dish and 3QD today & he’s all like “why didn’t you post it sooner? Didn’t you…

Love and BraaaAAAAIINNSSS

A classic tale of love and sacrifice, illustrated by Sean Bieri: While Bieri’s artistry technically depicts a Christmas story, it also nicely captures the undying-even-while-decaying-putrefying-and-hemorrhaging-IQ-points nature of true love. What more could you want for Valentine’s Day? (And let’s face it, we’ve all had Valentine’s Days that would arguably have been improved by a Zombocalypse.)…

Nabokov and “dual identities”

Gratifyingly, my post on Nabokov and Gould has generated interesting feedback, including this post by Jonah Lehrer, who expands on Nabokov’s own opinion of how his science informed his art. (Let’s just say he and Gould didn’t see eye-to-eye.) The post includes some wonderful Nabokov quotes about science, art, and butterflies, and Lehrer’s writing is,…

Dark pictures, thrones, the stones that pilgrims kiss, poems that take a thousand years to die but ape the immortality of this red label on a little butterfly. – excerpt from Vladimir Nabokov’s “On Discovering a Butterfly” It’s not very well known that novelist Vladimir Nabokov, author of Lolita, was also a lepidopterist; for six…

How often people speak of art and science as though they were two entirely different things, with no interconnection. An artist is emotional, they think, and uses only his intuition; he sees all at once and has no need of reason. A scientist is cold, they think, and uses only his reason; he argues carefully…

Weekend reading

Here are some essay links I’ve had open as tabs in my browser for over a week, waiting to be posted. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to do the extensive commentary they deserve, so I’m admitting that, and just posting them already. Enjoy. Graphical Abstracts & Biologists as Designers Andrew Sun discusses “graphical abstracts” at…

Because people have been discussing Google ngrams a lot, and because there are always major caveats to new datamining methodologies, I have to link Natalie Binder’s excellent series of posts urging caution, not only about the methodology, but about assuming too much about ngrams’ utility in social research.