Medical Illustration and History

bioephemera

Category archives for Medical Illustration and History

Postmortem sleeping beauties

Through the end of May, UMBC’s Albin O Kuhn gallery is hosting a large exhibition of postmortem daguerreotypes, death masks, coffin plates, etc. from the collection of Dr. Stanley Burns. Medical ephemera always have an emotional valence, because they represent patients who suffered, struggled and eventually lost their physical battles. But this collection of memorials…

More anatomy dresses!

Scapular Art Dress Rachel Wright I’m about to go back offline again because I don’t feel up to blogging, but I had to share this find from my friend Shana – she does know what belongs on BioE! These are one-of-a-kind art dresses by artist Rachel Wright (Toolgrrl Designs on etsy). Wright says, This piece…

Anatomical engraving from Henry Gray’s Anatomy, 1858. A month or so ago, Abrams books reached out to mention that they were releasing a new title, Human Anatomy: A Visual History from the Renaissance to the Digital Age. I said, “don’t I already have this book?” It turns out I did – I had the previous,…

Haute Macabre found artist Celina Saubidet on etsy, where she sells silver-plated bronze “osseous jewelry” from her shop Joyeria Osea. I think this skeletal hand is pretty over the top, but hey – sometimes you need a little drama. Check out her fingerbone rings for a more subtle anatomical statement.

The Zombie Autopsies

Shambling, slowly disintegrating zombies aren’t good for much – but maybe they’re helpful for teaching neurobiology? The Zombie Autopsies with Steven Schlozman, MD from GCP authors on Vimeo. It is all about braaaaiiiiiinnns, after all. . . . Read all about Zombie Autopsies here, or head to Amazon.

The 2011 Congress of Curious Peoples, featuring, among other guests, Anna Maerker, author of Model Experts: Wax Anatomies and Enlightenment in Florence and Vienna, 1775-1815; Mike Sappol, author of A Traffic of Dead Bodies: Anatomy and Embodied Social Identity in Nineteenth-Century America; Elizabeth Stephens, author of Anatomy as Spectacle: Public Exhibitions of the Body from…

Deborah Blum: the Radium Girls

A really interesting post from Deborah Blum on the “radium girls” who painted wristwatches in the 1920s – to fatal effect: At the factory, the dial painters were taught to shape their brushes to a fine point with their lips, producing the sharp tip needed to paint the tiny numbers and lines of watch dials,…

Call for irreverent mashups!

O designer-readers who like to work and play with Photoshop, this contest may be up your alley: Quirk Books, the outfit behind Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, has joined with Bridgeman Art Library to invite submissions for its “Art of the Mash-Up” competition. Basically, they want you to prove you can do better than the…

Brian Dettmer, the Book Surgeon

Lest any of my faithful readers think they’re the only ones whose wonderful linky suggestions I don’t seem to get around to posting, my boyfriend sent me this and I didn’t post it, and apparently it’s on the Daily Dish and 3QD today & he’s all like “why didn’t you post it sooner? Didn’t you…

The placebo effect, of course! A video by Daniel Keogh (Twitterfeed) and Luke Harris. h/t Ed Yong.