Museum Lust

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Category archives for Museum Lust

Anatomical engraving from Henry Gray’s Anatomy, 1858. A month or so ago, Abrams books reached out to mention that they were releasing a new title, Human Anatomy: A Visual History from the Renaissance to the Digital Age. I said, “don’t I already have this book?” It turns out I did – I had the previous,…

The 2011 Congress of Curious Peoples, featuring, among other guests, Anna Maerker, author of Model Experts: Wax Anatomies and Enlightenment in Florence and Vienna, 1775-1815; Mike Sappol, author of A Traffic of Dead Bodies: Anatomy and Embodied Social Identity in Nineteenth-Century America; Elizabeth Stephens, author of Anatomy as Spectacle: Public Exhibitions of the Body from…

David Clarke, president of the DC chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators (a great group that I considered joining once, long ago and several careers away), just passed along an invitation to an event next week. The artists who created the work in the Smithsonian’s NMNH Hall of Human Origins will be talking…

Brian Dettmer, the Book Surgeon

Lest any of my faithful readers think they’re the only ones whose wonderful linky suggestions I don’t seem to get around to posting, my boyfriend sent me this and I didn’t post it, and apparently it’s on the Daily Dish and 3QD today & he’s all like “why didn’t you post it sooner? Didn’t you…

I’m too busy to write anything remotely interesting right now, so thanks, NYT & Bay Citizen, for filling the gap with an article about how Eadweard Muybridge. Best known for photo sequences capturing running horses and athletes, Muybridge bridged (ahem) art and science in his work, in addition to having a peculiar name*: Like the…

Experiencing late-afternoon unproductivity? Go play with Google Art Project and virtually tour the world’s museums. Update: NYT review.

The NYT has a great little article about Chevalier Jackson, a turn-of-the-century doctor who kept a collection of foreign objects removed from people’s throats. Dr. Jackson “preserved more than 2,000 objects that people had swallowed or inhaled: nails and bolts, miniature binoculars, a radiator key, a child’s perfect-attendance pin, a medallion that says “Carry me…

Via iO9, a Nature News slideshow of natural history engravings by physician Martin Lister’s teenage daughters, who contributed technically accurate engravings of shells to one of his books, the Historiae Conchyliorum: Historians now believe the pair were the first women to use microscopes to help produce some of their scientific drawings. Anna and Susanna’s place…

Whether you’re studying, working, or just trying to stay warm this week, take a moment to appreciate this view of the inner workings of this positively Yeatsian music box: Mechanical Bird Music Box I admit it: I burst out laughing at the unexpected closure of the box. Poor little bird! (Yet he rose again, phoenix-like,…

Dave Hone’s blog, Archosaur Musings, is hosting a wonderful series of interviews with paleoartists – artists and illustrators who specialize in resurrecting lost species for scientific publications, popular media, and/or fine art. Check out Mark Witton and Todd Marshall for particularly interesting perspectives. Not only are these pretty posts with lots of eye candy, they’re…