Neuroscience

bioephemera

Category archives for Neuroscience

NYC scientist and filmmaker Alexis Gambis is building a body of science-themed short films. His documentary A Fruit Fly In New York juxtaposes lab equipment with the infrastructure of New York City; between grad students and postdocs relating the (somewhat deadpan) joys of fruit fly research, befuddled New Yorkers puzzle over a vial of Drosophila…

Google Your Body: Body Browser

Google Labs just released a new “experiment” – Body Browser. You have to upgrade to Google Chrome beta if you don’t already have it, but when you do, you can play with a 3-D, rotatable reconstruction of a (female) human body. Sliders let you fade the circulatory, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems in and out…

Just in: Carl Schoonover’s Portraits of the Mind, which I reviewed a few weeks ago, gets the New York Times Science section treatment. Check out their video interview with Carl; his account of the book’s genesis illustrates the benefits that accrue when scientists take the opportunity to share the things that excite them about their…

This year’s winner of the BioScapes digital imaging competition, Igor Siwanowicz, triumphed with a somewhat unusual portrait. To most biologists, it should be clear what anatomical structures are shown here – but what species could this be? Igor Siwanowicz, Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology, Munich, Germany. First Prize, 2010 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®. click…

For health organizations, federal agencies and nonprofits alike, it’s a challenge to get anyone to pay attention long enough to hear your prevention messages, much less to actually change their behavior as a result. It’s even harder with kids. It’s not that they don’t care about science; quite the contrary, they love it – especially…

Hippocampus: Broad Overview Tamily Weissman, Jeff Lichtman, and Joshua Sanes, 2005 from Portraits of the Mind: Visualizing the Brain from Antiquity to the 21st Century by Carl Schoonover The first time I created a transgenic neuron, it was in a worm, C. elegans — a tiny, transparent cousin of the earthworm. I injected DNA into…

Have e-books killed tree-books?

Have e-books killed tree-books? I hope not – I love hefting a brand-new book in my hand and letting the pages fan open. It’s sensual and anticipation-laden, like opening a bottle of good wine. But perhaps science writer and blogger Carl Zimmer is hedging his bets on the future of paper books: he’s released his…

An Eyeful of Sound

Just in: the 2010 Imagine Science Films Festival‘s Nature Scientific Merit award, given to “a short film that exemplifies science in narrative filmmaking in a compelling, credible and inspiring manner,” is An Eyeful of Sound, a short film about audio-visual synaesthesia by Samantha Moore. Here’s the trailer:  An Eyeful of Sound – trailer from…

This, this and this all came close, but in the end, it took a book: a yummy new neuroscience, history of science, beauty of science, wow-brains-are-beautiful book.

In the New York Times, a quick article on a study in the journal Neurosurgery by two Johns Hopkins professors. The abstract argues that Michaelangelo concealed another neuronanatomic structure in the final panel of this series, the Separation of Light From Darkness, specifically a ventral view of the brainstem. The Separation of Light From Darkness…