Science

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Category archives for Science

SpaceChem!

A few months ago I got an email from Zachtronics, creators of the Codex of Alchemical Engineering, about the new indie game called SpaceChem. It was billed as “an obscenely addictive, design-based puzzle game about building machines and fighting monsters in the name of science.” What’s not to love? Here’s a preview. . .

Recently, Scienceblogs/National Geographic decided it would no longer host pseudonymous science bloggers. As a result, many of my former colleagues have left. I think this decision was wrong. Read on for my reasons.

This video from Xperia Studio very effectively conveys how data visualization can both leverage and challenge our conceptions of “reality.” The night sky we’ve seen since childhood, like everything else we see, is just a tiny slice of the spectrum – only what we can perceive with our limited physiology. An app that lets us…

Greg Dunn’s golden neurons

Gold Cortex 16 x 20, 2010 Greg Dunn I used to have a beautiful gold Japanese folding screen, which was purchased by my great-grandmother’s feisty sister on a trip in the 1920s. I loved the gold patina and the surprisingly modern impact it had on my wall. At the moment, it’s loaned to a friend,…

“Magnetic Field Outflows from Active Galactic Nuclei” P.M. Sutter, P.M. Ricker, H.-Y. Yang, G. Foreman, D. Pugmire/ORNL Wired has an article/webgallery of award-winning scientific visualizations which is worth a lunchtime visit. (Having trouble with Wired‘s interface? The videos collected there are the winners from SciDAC 2011′s “Visualization Night” challenge, so you can also just watch…

What with all the buzz surrounding Bjork’s Biophilia project, science films are so hawt right now! Don’t know what I’m talking about? Then check out this weirdness: Yeah. . . okay! Anyway, some other science/film folks, the crew over at Imagine films, reached out to ask me to remind you that the deadline is approaching…

From the Smithsonian, a short video about using technology to virtually reassemble ancient art from fragments long carried away and dispersed: Majestic sixth-century Chinese Buddhist sculpture is combined with 3-D imaging technology in this exploration of one of the most important groups of Buddhist devotional sites in early medieval China. Carved into the mountains of…

. . . they could have. Or pretty darn close, at least – they just needed to visit one of the many European cabinets of anatomical curiosities, to see the work of anatomists like Honore Fragonard. Fragonard’s eighteenth-century ecorches were the clear precursors to Gunther von Hagens’ “Body Worlds” exhibits: preserved, injected, partially dissected bodies…

Cell Division IV Michele Banks DC area artist Michele Banks has donated one of her cell division watercolors to raise funds for art outreach. Check out the online auction – the painting is matted and framed and currently going for only $52. Michele is not a biologist, but she’s been on a sci-art kick for…

A CSPO webcast entitled “New Tools for Science Policy” asks an interesting, if somewhat odd, question about science and art: “Can art and religion serve as methods for governing emerging science and technology?” More details: Tuesday, May 24, 2011, 5:30 p.m. EDT (webcast will be here) Participants: Dr. Greg Graffin, Recent author of Anarchy Evolution,…