Science in Culture & Policy

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Category archives for Science in Culture & Policy

In a guest post at Scientific American, Rebecca Jablonsky says, Kuhn de-legitimized the understanding of science as implicitly including objective reality, leaving room for theory to de-stabilize rituals of practice and produce authentic innovation-something that is certainly prized in both artistic and scientific communities alike. Seriously – go read it and come back. It’s short.…

What with all the buzz surrounding Bjork’s Biophilia project, science films are so hawt right now! Don’t know what I’m talking about? Then check out this weirdness: Yeah. . . okay! Anyway, some other science/film folks, the crew over at Imagine films, reached out to ask me to remind you that the deadline is approaching…

. . . they could have. Or pretty darn close, at least – they just needed to visit one of the many European cabinets of anatomical curiosities, to see the work of anatomists like Honore Fragonard. Fragonard’s eighteenth-century ecorches were the clear precursors to Gunther von Hagens’ “Body Worlds” exhibits: preserved, injected, partially dissected bodies…

A CSPO webcast entitled “New Tools for Science Policy” asks an interesting, if somewhat odd, question about science and art: “Can art and religion serve as methods for governing emerging science and technology?” More details: Tuesday, May 24, 2011, 5:30 p.m. EDT (webcast will be here) Participants: Dr. Greg Graffin, Recent author of Anarchy Evolution,…

Animated Anatomies, a new show at the Perkins Library at Duke University, explores the tradition of fold-out or pop-up paper anatomical diagrams: Animated Anatomies explores the visually stunning and technically complex genre of printed texts and illustrations known as anatomical flap books. These publications invite the viewer to participate in virtual autopsies, through the process…

I was playing The Fracking Song last night about midnight, and my boyfriend was grooving to it. At the end he asked, “what was that about?” “Uh. . . fracking.” “Which kind of fracking?” Yes, we are a BSG household. Anyway, it may be an explainer, but it’s actually quite a nice little piece of…

Miracle of Science: the Cambridge bar around the corner from MIT, where the menu is a (pseudo) periodic table. May I recommend the grilled chicken salad with cilantro lime dressing, “Sc”?

So I ran across this thread, and it made me sad. (And no, not because it wasn’t Ed Yong’s blog, although that too.) It started off as a happy post: the author, Paula Chambers, is a PhD who began her own online community for PhDs seeking jobs outside academia. That’s awesome. But when Chambers went…

Stop torturing me, MIT!

Now this is just cruel: yesterday the Cambridge Science Festival kicked off – a week of science, sciart, sci-journalism and sci-education activities at MIT, Harvard, the Museum of Science, and surrounds. Am I going to be hanging out all day with my fellow-geeks in the sun (which finally came out a few days ago, right…

“Reasoning was not designed to pursue the truth. Reasoning was designed by evolution to help us win arguments.” – Jonathan Haidt, “The New Science of Morality”, invoking the work of H. Mercier and D. Sperber. (the whole talk is really interesting).