Science in Culture & Policy

bioephemera

Category archives for Science in Culture & Policy

Adam Winnik sent me this animation inspired by Carl Sagan’s famous “pale blue dot” monologue. It’s true to the serious implications of Sagan’s words, yet wry and lighthearted (mostly). A lovely example of remix culture revitalizing a classic of biology. Adam gives some background: I’ve been enrolled in illustration at Sheridan College for the the…

At the moment, a few blocks away, a few of my friends are attending a Science and Technology Studies (STS) conference at the Harvard Kennedy School. I have no idea what they’re doing, although I’m sure it’s very smart. I’m only here to tell you they have THE CREEPIEST POSTER I have ever seen for…

While we’re on the bioanimation topic, I recently heard from Jess at Nervous System, who sent me links to some animations of their new jewelry line, hyphae, “growing” in virtual space. Check it out: Hyphae – growth of the Vessel Pendant from Nervous System on Vimeo. They explain, Hyphae is a collection of 3D printed…

Wait – did Peter Nowogrodski just shoehorn everything I love into one meandering, indulgent multimedia essay??* Tolkien’s Shire appears as a coherent ecosystem, cradled by productive fields and populated by abundant orchards, caches of edible mushroom, and even the fishable Bywater Pool, ornamented with an authentic churning mill. The land at Hobbiton is changing still:…

Wow – my post about unhappy bio grad students is getting massive traffic. (Hi SlashDotters and StumbleUpon-ers!) Mike the Mad Biologist, my original inspiration, has responded here and here to all the buzz. I pretty much said everything I wanted to say in the original post, and I don’t pretend to have an explanation or…

Myriad Oral Argument Recordings

The oral arguments in Monday’s Myriad appeal are online here. (Scroll down and look for Association for Molecular [Pathology] v. PTO).

Tomorrow morning, a three-judge panel of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit will hear arguments in the appeal of Association for Molecular Pathology v. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office – better known as the Myriad gene patent case.* It has the patent and genetic blogospheres in a bit of a tizzy, and the…

It’s the very last installment of Zombiefest – one more book review, this time for one I heartily recommend! Daniel Drezner, a professor of international politics at Tufts, prefaces his new book about zombies with an unexpected vignette – a visit to Graceland: By the time my tour hit the Jungle Room, it was obvious…

The myriad miseries of graduate school are reserved to no one discipline, but there may be something to the contention that biology graduate programs are particularly bad. Here’s what Mike the Mad Biologist says, in response to Science Professor, and I think he’s quite right: The basic problem stems (so to speak) from too many…

The 2011 Congress of Curious Peoples, featuring, among other guests, Anna Maerker, author of Model Experts: Wax Anatomies and Enlightenment in Florence and Vienna, 1775-1815; Mike Sappol, author of A Traffic of Dead Bodies: Anatomy and Embodied Social Identity in Nineteenth-Century America; Elizabeth Stephens, author of Anatomy as Spectacle: Public Exhibitions of the Body from…