journalism

bioephemera

Tag archives for journalism

Wait, what? Did you see or not?

A slight science journalism FAIL in a story at iO9, originally from the New Scientist: the Title: “First Quantum Effects Seen in Visible Object” the Lede: “Does Schrödinger’s cat really exist? You bet. The first ever quantum superposition in an object visible to the naked eye has been observed.” the Discovery: “[researchers showed] that a…

The initial reviews of Chris Mooney and Sheril Kirshenbaum’s new book Unscientific America: How Scientific Illiteracy Threatens our Future produced a small blogospheric kerfuffle last month. But I think Unscientific America has much more constructive and useful things to offer than provoking more arguments, and there are a lot of reviews focusing on the positives.…

If you’ve been following the Jared Diamond/New Yorker controversy, or my ongoing posts on journalism vs. blogging (here, here, here, here, here), you might be intrigued by this conversation about the culture of fact-checking in journalism, between journalism professor Jay Rosen and programmer Dave Winer, in their podcast series Rebooting the News. Consider this riddle:…

This would be funnier if it weren’t so painfully true. Also see the sequel. I didn’t get to this for a few days because I was working too hard to blog last week. In the meantime, Language Log responded with an especially egregious example of this sort of oversimplification. Cartoon by Jorge Cham, via Sheril…

Just when I was wondering why there hasn’t been more mainstream coverage of the Jared Diamond/New Yorker lawsuit I blogged about at the beginning of this month, Columbia Journalism Review has an update. And in a recent article in Science, Diamond commented, saying “The complaint has no merit at all.” Oddly, the Science article (which…

This week, Nieman Journalism Lab is running a fascinating series of video interviews with the New York Times’ R&D group on the possible future face of news media. I know – you’re wondering why the supposedly financially moribund NYT is wasting money on nerds who play with Kindles. Who do they think they are, Google?…

The Diamond Mess

I was recently reading A Scientist’s Guide to Talking With the Media, a useful and clearheaded book by Richard Hayes and Daniel Grossman of the Union of Concerned Scientists. Emphasizing the importance of science outreach, Hayes and Grossman praise the pop-sci luminaries who followed in the footsteps of Carl Sagan: With his intriguing investigations into…

We all know Twitter can be annoying, but is it really evil? During the past week, you may have heard that there is brand-new neuroscientific evidence proving exactly that. But the hype turns out to be just that: hype. It all started with a press release from USC about an upcoming PNAS paper by Mary…

As I put it at a blogging panel last fall, “in science, it is normative to be not sure.” It wasn’t my most eloquent moment, but at least AAAS’ president-elect Alice Huang agrees with me that one of the biggest challenges to public science literacy is understanding the contingent nature of scientific “truth”.

Scibling Bora has expressed his wish “to end once for all the entire genre of discussing the “bloggers vs. journalists” trope,” and tried to do so with perhaps the most massive science-journalism-Web2.0 post evah.